View By Date

Tags

New Blogs

  • 17 Jun 2016
    Your Apple Watch is about to get the nearest thing to a brain transplant this fall. Apple’s watchOS 3, (announced on Monday at WWDC 2016) represents a fundamental rethinking of Apple’s only wearable. It's a concerted effort to clarify the sometimes confusing navigation, stop trying to control everything and to acknowledge that clever doesn't always equal useful.   SEE ALSO: The Apple Watch's iconic app screen isn't dead, but it is getting demoted "" name="google_ads_iframe_/6692/mash.as/inlinevideoseealso_0" width="1" height="1" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"> It's not that Apple Watch wasn't already a very good wearable device. But, for most people, the utility had narrowed down to notifications, reminders to stand-up and regular alerts about your level of activity ("Look, I closed a ring!"). Watch OS 2.0, which arrived late last year, added important features like third-party complications, HomeKit device access and, of course, access to native hardware for third-party apps. However, that last update also revealed a major weakness: These apps simply couldn’t load fast enough. Pre-loading oft-used apps in memory, as watchOS 3 promises to do, is going to make a major difference on that front, but I think it's some of the other upcoming watchOS 3 changes that will have the biggest impact on Apple Watch's overall utility.   A fresh face In some small ways, Apple Watch is becoming a bit more like the iPhone, meaning that watchOS is inheriting the best parts of iOS. A swipe up from the bottom of the watch will now reveal a control panel, just like on the iPhone. The Dock, which reveals cards of your most-used apps, looks a bit like the apps screen you get when you double-press the iPhone’s Touch ID button. (A swipe down from the top still gives access to notifications, something Apple got right with the Apple Watch from day one.) But there are even bigger, more fundamental and strategic changes. As my colleague Raymond Wong has noted thoroughly, a number of key functions, for instance, have been demoted or recast.       The Apple Watch home screen and its lovely cluster of app bubbles becomes an artifact of a failed user interface experiment. You’ll still be able to access it, but only when you press the digital crown. The Friends Circle that used to come up when you pressed the side button is dead, but the digital touches it encouraged (drawing, sending heartbeats) will have a new life in the much more powerful and cohesive iOS message system. Take Scribble, which turns finger swiping into drawings or handwriting. Scribble is now more or less the same between Apple mobile devices, but there's an extra wrinkle in watchOS 3: It will let you write an custom message one letter at at time — for those instances were the boilerplate responses aren't enough. (In my experience, they were almost never the ones I needed.)     Glances, which you accessed by sweeping up from the bottom of the Apple Watch screen and gave you quick links to things like your heart rate, battery life, activities and your calendar are done, too. That’s what the Dock is for: live cards of the apps you choose and the one you used most recently, instead of a set of features mostly selected by Apple. Even the Apple Watch iPhone app is getting an update. No other Apple utility looks as much like an afterthought as the current watch app. With the brand new Face Gallery, the watchOS 3 app finally reveals all the hard work third-party apps vendors have been doing to create watch complications and even their own Apple Watch faces. However, Apple’s change of heart is nowhere more evident in its fresh approach to activity and health.   Shaping up and calming down Ever since companies started producing smartwatches, there’s been an ongoing debate about whether or not anyone even wears watches. A lot of people had given them up for the watch in their pocket: their smartphone. Wearables were all about fitness. The Apple Watch, naturally, came with fitness- and health-tracking built in, but it was Apple’sbrand of fitness and the company often seemed more interested in people seeing Apple Watch as a watch and fashion accessory first and a fitness gadget second. That changes with watchOS 3. Activities may no longer have a "glance," but now they're a full-blown watch face. So the three rings of Movement (for calories) Exercise and Standing can now be ever-present if you wish. Activities also still live within an app (which means it’s in the app Dock) and as a watch complication. No matter where you find it, though, Apple has done away with the virtual navigation grid in favor of strips. That’s right, if you want to see your activities, you just scroll the heck down.  Follow Lance Ulanoff    ✔@LanceUlanoff Some of what's coming this fall in watchOS 3.0. #WWDC2016 12:27 AM - 14 Jun 2016      2626 Retweets      2121 likes   It’s a much less complicated approach that will surely appeal to workout fanatics who perhaps found Apple’s wearable health and fitness ideas confusing and somewhat inflexible. Speaking of flexibility, Apple has finally opened up the activity circles to third-party health and fitness apps like Strava. Now workouts done in your favorite workout app that start on the iPhone will get counted and continue on the watch. They’ll even let you define “Other” workouts. WatchOS also adds a new workout complication and, when you tap that, up to five live workout metrics. You’ll even be able to pause a workout by simultaneously pressing the side and crown buttons, which means you don’t even have to look at the watch to control the tracking.     Apple seems particularly proud of its new well-being-focused Breathe watch app, a watchOS 3 addition that’s probably not welcome news to apps like Headspace, which uses a mellifluous voice to help you practice mindfulness. Still, I have to applaud the simplicity of Apple’s approach. It’s really just about deep breathing, some flower graphics, and gentle wrist taps to help guide you along. Breathe seems emblematic of Apple’s larger watchOS 3 effort to help you achieve your goals without pressing its own methods and metrics upon you.   Do over Apple has sold millions of Apple Watches, but still felt the need for a course correction. Not enough people want beautiful timepieces, but many more want to work out and get credit for it. Not everyone is charmed by Apple’s cute ideas for reaching friends or seeing their schedule for a day or a week ago (Time Travel anyone?), but notifications, messaging and fast access to utility is something everyone can get behind. WatchOS still bears little resemblance to any of the other wearable interfaces out there, but, like Samsung and Google before it, Apple has taken a major second swing at the wearable market. The Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2 showed that Samsung was listening to customer feedback and took note of the general disinterest in its previous (and relatively bulky) Gear watches. Android Wear 2.0 was also a major update that helped turn Google's wearable platform into something usable. Apple calls its new wearable platform watchOS 3, but it's really the second iteration of the platform. And like everyone else, Apple is finally figuring this space out.
    5587 Posted by YouNet Company
  • Your Apple Watch is about to get the nearest thing to a brain transplant this fall. Apple’s watchOS 3, (announced on Monday at WWDC 2016) represents a fundamental rethinking of Apple’s only wearable. It's a concerted effort to clarify the sometimes confusing navigation, stop trying to control everything and to acknowledge that clever doesn't always equal useful.   SEE ALSO: The Apple Watch's iconic app screen isn't dead, but it is getting demoted "" name="google_ads_iframe_/6692/mash.as/inlinevideoseealso_0" width="1" height="1" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"> It's not that Apple Watch wasn't already a very good wearable device. But, for most people, the utility had narrowed down to notifications, reminders to stand-up and regular alerts about your level of activity ("Look, I closed a ring!"). Watch OS 2.0, which arrived late last year, added important features like third-party complications, HomeKit device access and, of course, access to native hardware for third-party apps. However, that last update also revealed a major weakness: These apps simply couldn’t load fast enough. Pre-loading oft-used apps in memory, as watchOS 3 promises to do, is going to make a major difference on that front, but I think it's some of the other upcoming watchOS 3 changes that will have the biggest impact on Apple Watch's overall utility.   A fresh face In some small ways, Apple Watch is becoming a bit more like the iPhone, meaning that watchOS is inheriting the best parts of iOS. A swipe up from the bottom of the watch will now reveal a control panel, just like on the iPhone. The Dock, which reveals cards of your most-used apps, looks a bit like the apps screen you get when you double-press the iPhone’s Touch ID button. (A swipe down from the top still gives access to notifications, something Apple got right with the Apple Watch from day one.) But there are even bigger, more fundamental and strategic changes. As my colleague Raymond Wong has noted thoroughly, a number of key functions, for instance, have been demoted or recast.       The Apple Watch home screen and its lovely cluster of app bubbles becomes an artifact of a failed user interface experiment. You’ll still be able to access it, but only when you press the digital crown. The Friends Circle that used to come up when you pressed the side button is dead, but the digital touches it encouraged (drawing, sending heartbeats) will have a new life in the much more powerful and cohesive iOS message system. Take Scribble, which turns finger swiping into drawings or handwriting. Scribble is now more or less the same between Apple mobile devices, but there's an extra wrinkle in watchOS 3: It will let you write an custom message one letter at at time — for those instances were the boilerplate responses aren't enough. (In my experience, they were almost never the ones I needed.)     Glances, which you accessed by sweeping up from the bottom of the Apple Watch screen and gave you quick links to things like your heart rate, battery life, activities and your calendar are done, too. That’s what the Dock is for: live cards of the apps you choose and the one you used most recently, instead of a set of features mostly selected by Apple. Even the Apple Watch iPhone app is getting an update. No other Apple utility looks as much like an afterthought as the current watch app. With the brand new Face Gallery, the watchOS 3 app finally reveals all the hard work third-party apps vendors have been doing to create watch complications and even their own Apple Watch faces. However, Apple’s change of heart is nowhere more evident in its fresh approach to activity and health.   Shaping up and calming down Ever since companies started producing smartwatches, there’s been an ongoing debate about whether or not anyone even wears watches. A lot of people had given them up for the watch in their pocket: their smartphone. Wearables were all about fitness. The Apple Watch, naturally, came with fitness- and health-tracking built in, but it was Apple’sbrand of fitness and the company often seemed more interested in people seeing Apple Watch as a watch and fashion accessory first and a fitness gadget second. That changes with watchOS 3. Activities may no longer have a "glance," but now they're a full-blown watch face. So the three rings of Movement (for calories) Exercise and Standing can now be ever-present if you wish. Activities also still live within an app (which means it’s in the app Dock) and as a watch complication. No matter where you find it, though, Apple has done away with the virtual navigation grid in favor of strips. That’s right, if you want to see your activities, you just scroll the heck down.  Follow Lance Ulanoff    ✔@LanceUlanoff Some of what's coming this fall in watchOS 3.0. #WWDC2016 12:27 AM - 14 Jun 2016      2626 Retweets      2121 likes   It’s a much less complicated approach that will surely appeal to workout fanatics who perhaps found Apple’s wearable health and fitness ideas confusing and somewhat inflexible. Speaking of flexibility, Apple has finally opened up the activity circles to third-party health and fitness apps like Strava. Now workouts done in your favorite workout app that start on the iPhone will get counted and continue on the watch. They’ll even let you define “Other” workouts. WatchOS also adds a new workout complication and, when you tap that, up to five live workout metrics. You’ll even be able to pause a workout by simultaneously pressing the side and crown buttons, which means you don’t even have to look at the watch to control the tracking.     Apple seems particularly proud of its new well-being-focused Breathe watch app, a watchOS 3 addition that’s probably not welcome news to apps like Headspace, which uses a mellifluous voice to help you practice mindfulness. Still, I have to applaud the simplicity of Apple’s approach. It’s really just about deep breathing, some flower graphics, and gentle wrist taps to help guide you along. Breathe seems emblematic of Apple’s larger watchOS 3 effort to help you achieve your goals without pressing its own methods and metrics upon you.   Do over Apple has sold millions of Apple Watches, but still felt the need for a course correction. Not enough people want beautiful timepieces, but many more want to work out and get credit for it. Not everyone is charmed by Apple’s cute ideas for reaching friends or seeing their schedule for a day or a week ago (Time Travel anyone?), but notifications, messaging and fast access to utility is something everyone can get behind. WatchOS still bears little resemblance to any of the other wearable interfaces out there, but, like Samsung and Google before it, Apple has taken a major second swing at the wearable market. The Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2 showed that Samsung was listening to customer feedback and took note of the general disinterest in its previous (and relatively bulky) Gear watches. Android Wear 2.0 was also a major update that helped turn Google's wearable platform into something usable. Apple calls its new wearable platform watchOS 3, but it's really the second iteration of the platform. And like everyone else, Apple is finally figuring this space out.
    Jun 17, 2016 5587
  • 16 Apr 2015
          Bạn cần chuẩn bị những nguyên liệu sau để làm món cơm cháy - kho quẹt: - 100g thịt mỡ. Có thể dùng mỡ hoàn toàn, hoặc dùng thịt ba rọi chỗ nhiều mỡ - 50g tôm khô - 2 thìa đường - 3 thìa mắm - Vài củ hành tím, vài trái ớt - Rau củ để luộc thì tùy theo mùa và vùng miền. 1. Làm kho quẹt: Thịt mỡ rửa sạch thái hạt lựu nhỏ,   Tôm khô ngâm mềm, Cho thịt mỡ vào chảo   Thắng cho ra mỡ   Vớt phần tóp mỡ để riêng. Phần mỡ nước nếu nhiều quá thì chắt bớt ra, để lại khoảng 2-3 thìa phở dùng làm kho quẹt. Hành củ xắt lát mỏng.   Ớt xanh ớt đỏ thái nhỏ. Cho hành vào chảo mỡ, phi thơm.   Tiếp theo cho tôm vào, đảo săn. Cho nước mắm và đường vao, có thể thêm một chút nước lọc để giảm bớt độ mặn (nhưng kho quẹt đúng điệu thì phải mặn hơn bình thường một chút). Đun kho quẹt liu riu một lúc thì cho ớt và tóp mỡ vào, đun thêm một chút nữa là được. Sở dĩ mình cho tóp mỡ vào sau cùng, vì muốn ăn tóp mỡ giòn. Bạn có thể cho tóp mỡ vào cùng tôm ngay từ đầu cũng được nhé. Sau khi đun thì kho quẹt cạn bớt nước và keo lại, lúc này tắt bếp, rắc thêm chút tiêu bột là xong. 2. Làm cơm cháy: Cơm tẻ trộn với 1 xíu dầu ăn và gia vị hoặc nước mắm, Cho cơm vào chảo, thêm chút xíu nước, đậy vung đun mềm rồi dàn mỏng. Sau khi dàn mỏng, thỉnh thoảng rưới vào 1 thìa nước, (nghe xèo xèo rất vui tai) rồi lại ấn ấn cho hạt cơm liên kết với nhau. Cho nước khoảng 3-4 lần như thế thì mặt cơm sẽ vàng, lật sang mặt kia, làm tương tự. Nếu cơm được nấu bằng gạo dẻo thì không cần trộn gia vị, cũng không cần thêm nước khi làm cơm cháy vì hạt cơm mềm, dễ dàng dính với nhau. 3. Luộc rau: Đun nước trong một nồi tương đối rộng để rau được chìm hoàn toàn trong nước thoải mái và không chật chội. Khi nước sôi, thả vào một nhúm muối tinh. Sau đó, luộc từng loại rau, chín thì vớt ra, rồi cho loại khác vào. Chú ý, giữ lửa sao cho nước lúc nào cũng sôi mạnh, trùm kín hết rau, và rau không quá chật Với các loại rau có màu xanh như là rau cải, đậu cove, để giữ được màu xanh không bị xỉn thì ngay khi vớt rau ra thì thả ngay vào tô nước lạnh. Kho quẹt là món ăn có xuất xứ từ miền Nam, vốn là món ăn của những người dân nghèo để chấm cùng rau củ cho đậm đà. Ngày nay nó được biết đến và yêu thích trong rất nhiều nhà hàng và đã xuất hiện rất nhiều biến tấu cho món kho quẹt giản dị, trong đó cách làm kho quẹt được giới thiệu trong bài viết này là một kiểu khá phổ biến.    Ngoài ra thay vì chỉ ăn kèm rau củ luộc giản dị thì bạn có thể làm thêm cơm cháy chấm cùng cũng rất hợp vị, nhất là trong những ngày trời lạnh được chấm miếng cơm cháy giòn rụm vào nồi kho quẹt đậm đà cay thơm thì còn gì bằng!
    7078 Posted by YouNet Company
  •       Bạn cần chuẩn bị những nguyên liệu sau để làm món cơm cháy - kho quẹt: - 100g thịt mỡ. Có thể dùng mỡ hoàn toàn, hoặc dùng thịt ba rọi chỗ nhiều mỡ - 50g tôm khô - 2 thìa đường - 3 thìa mắm - Vài củ hành tím, vài trái ớt - Rau củ để luộc thì tùy theo mùa và vùng miền. 1. Làm kho quẹt: Thịt mỡ rửa sạch thái hạt lựu nhỏ,   Tôm khô ngâm mềm, Cho thịt mỡ vào chảo   Thắng cho ra mỡ   Vớt phần tóp mỡ để riêng. Phần mỡ nước nếu nhiều quá thì chắt bớt ra, để lại khoảng 2-3 thìa phở dùng làm kho quẹt. Hành củ xắt lát mỏng.   Ớt xanh ớt đỏ thái nhỏ. Cho hành vào chảo mỡ, phi thơm.   Tiếp theo cho tôm vào, đảo săn. Cho nước mắm và đường vao, có thể thêm một chút nước lọc để giảm bớt độ mặn (nhưng kho quẹt đúng điệu thì phải mặn hơn bình thường một chút). Đun kho quẹt liu riu một lúc thì cho ớt và tóp mỡ vào, đun thêm một chút nữa là được. Sở dĩ mình cho tóp mỡ vào sau cùng, vì muốn ăn tóp mỡ giòn. Bạn có thể cho tóp mỡ vào cùng tôm ngay từ đầu cũng được nhé. Sau khi đun thì kho quẹt cạn bớt nước và keo lại, lúc này tắt bếp, rắc thêm chút tiêu bột là xong. 2. Làm cơm cháy: Cơm tẻ trộn với 1 xíu dầu ăn và gia vị hoặc nước mắm, Cho cơm vào chảo, thêm chút xíu nước, đậy vung đun mềm rồi dàn mỏng. Sau khi dàn mỏng, thỉnh thoảng rưới vào 1 thìa nước, (nghe xèo xèo rất vui tai) rồi lại ấn ấn cho hạt cơm liên kết với nhau. Cho nước khoảng 3-4 lần như thế thì mặt cơm sẽ vàng, lật sang mặt kia, làm tương tự. Nếu cơm được nấu bằng gạo dẻo thì không cần trộn gia vị, cũng không cần thêm nước khi làm cơm cháy vì hạt cơm mềm, dễ dàng dính với nhau. 3. Luộc rau: Đun nước trong một nồi tương đối rộng để rau được chìm hoàn toàn trong nước thoải mái và không chật chội. Khi nước sôi, thả vào một nhúm muối tinh. Sau đó, luộc từng loại rau, chín thì vớt ra, rồi cho loại khác vào. Chú ý, giữ lửa sao cho nước lúc nào cũng sôi mạnh, trùm kín hết rau, và rau không quá chật Với các loại rau có màu xanh như là rau cải, đậu cove, để giữ được màu xanh không bị xỉn thì ngay khi vớt rau ra thì thả ngay vào tô nước lạnh. Kho quẹt là món ăn có xuất xứ từ miền Nam, vốn là món ăn của những người dân nghèo để chấm cùng rau củ cho đậm đà. Ngày nay nó được biết đến và yêu thích trong rất nhiều nhà hàng và đã xuất hiện rất nhiều biến tấu cho món kho quẹt giản dị, trong đó cách làm kho quẹt được giới thiệu trong bài viết này là một kiểu khá phổ biến.    Ngoài ra thay vì chỉ ăn kèm rau củ luộc giản dị thì bạn có thể làm thêm cơm cháy chấm cùng cũng rất hợp vị, nhất là trong những ngày trời lạnh được chấm miếng cơm cháy giòn rụm vào nồi kho quẹt đậm đà cay thơm thì còn gì bằng!
    Apr 16, 2015 7078
  • 24 Dec 2014
    Fashionable Décor: Kleenex Launches New Statement Designs Posted by: Everything Beautiful March 17, 2014 Kleenex-isaac-mizrahi Rustic & Earthy Kleenex is helping to make your spaces both functional and stylish with their versatile line of trendy boxes. This March they have introduced new special editions designs, which have been inspired by the latest in fashion and runway trends. They are truly one-of-a-kind and add a uniquely bold edge to the theme of any space. From energetic florals to geometric prints, and the black and white leopard pattern shown above, they are also a great way to express your personal style. I was inspired by the black and white leopard print and incorporated it into my “Earthy” dining room. The Mahogany wood table, black leather chairs, musk-green painted wall, chestnut textured candle, and earth-toned pebble center piece, all contribute to that rustic feel that I love. What I found important to add to this theme however was a touch of bold with bright flowers for an uplifting feel. Finally, to complement this, the stark contrast of the black and white Kleenex box worked perfectly and also adds that functionality aspect to a space with having accessible tissues. What’s more, I was able to incorporate all of these unique designs into my living space, each offering its own special flair to the room no matter the theme. It was fun to play around with them and be creative. It’s also great to know I can have affordable style as part of my interior decoration ;) photo-29 Spring Brights! - See more at: http://www.everything-beautiful.com/fashionable-decor-kleenex/#sthash.liFkcSiz.dpuf
    1392 Posted by Coca Cola
  • Fashionable Décor: Kleenex Launches New Statement Designs Posted by: Everything Beautiful March 17, 2014 Kleenex-isaac-mizrahi Rustic & Earthy Kleenex is helping to make your spaces both functional and stylish with their versatile line of trendy boxes. This March they have introduced new special editions designs, which have been inspired by the latest in fashion and runway trends. They are truly one-of-a-kind and add a uniquely bold edge to the theme of any space. From energetic florals to geometric prints, and the black and white leopard pattern shown above, they are also a great way to express your personal style. I was inspired by the black and white leopard print and incorporated it into my “Earthy” dining room. The Mahogany wood table, black leather chairs, musk-green painted wall, chestnut textured candle, and earth-toned pebble center piece, all contribute to that rustic feel that I love. What I found important to add to this theme however was a touch of bold with bright flowers for an uplifting feel. Finally, to complement this, the stark contrast of the black and white Kleenex box worked perfectly and also adds that functionality aspect to a space with having accessible tissues. What’s more, I was able to incorporate all of these unique designs into my living space, each offering its own special flair to the room no matter the theme. It was fun to play around with them and be creative. It’s also great to know I can have affordable style as part of my interior decoration ;) photo-29 Spring Brights! - See more at: http://www.everything-beautiful.com/fashionable-decor-kleenex/#sthash.liFkcSiz.dpuf
    Dec 24, 2014 1392
  • 24 Nov 2014
    Over to Greece where government leaders are expressing optimism that the debt-stricken country is inching ever closer to exiting its EU-IMF sponsored bailout programme. From Athens our correspondent Helena Smith reports: Hours after euro area finance ministers agreed to consider throwing Greece a precautionary credit line, Athens’ deputy prime minister Evangelos Venizelos said the decision had effectively launched the country’s exit from often onerous international supervision. “The eurogroup meeting fits absolutely with our planning,” he told reporters, reiterating that the government’s aim was to strike a deal with lenders by year’s end. “The goal is to have left the regime of the memorandum and troika [oversight] and to have returned to [having] a status of essential equality in the eurozone … without emergency mechanisms such as the troika. There will be nothing better. Giving its first sign of support for Athens’ avowed aim to exit its economic adjustment programme by 2015, the euro group announced that it would begin discussions on the details of a new credit line for the twice-bailed out country late on Thursday. Tthe Greek Finance Ministry in Athens. Photo: Reuters/Alkis Konstantinidis “Taking into account the still fragile market sentiment and the many reform challenges ahead there is strong support for a precautionary credit line,” the euro group’s chairman, Jeroen Dijsselbloem, said at the session. EU aid disbursements drawn down from the €240bn bailout scheme are due to expire this year. Although the credit line could be guaranteed through the European Stability Mechanism, Dijsselbloem insisted there was “broad consensus” that the IMF remain involved in the new plan, the nuts and bolts of which are not expected to be finalized until the next euro group meeting on December 8 at the earliest. Venizelos made the statements as media reports filtered through that the vehemently anti-austerity main opposition leader, Alexis Tsipras, had requested a meeting with the new European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker. Tsipras’ radical left Syriza party has been at pains to strengthen ties with European officials amid polls that have shown it would come first if, as many expect, a snap election is held early next year. Media reports suggested that Tsipras’ request had been welcomed by Juncker who has publicly criticized the young leader’s policies in the past.The prospect of Syriza assuming power has unnerved the business community. Alexis Tsipras, leader of Greece’s Syriza party. Photo: Reuters/Yorgos Karahalis On that note, it’s time to close up for the evening. Thanks for all your comments, have a good weekend, and we’ll be back on Monday. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   5.37pm17:37 European markets end week on mixed note There was a two way pull on the market, with early gains after the ECB’s hints on Thursday of further action to help the struggling eurozone economy. But worries about further Russian incursions into Ukraine, not to mention a volatile rouble, punctured the optimism, and worries about a slowdown in the banking sector with poor loan growth did not help matters. A revival in mining shares helped keep the UK market in positive terrritory, but elsewhere the picture was more negative. The final scores showed: The FTSE 100 finished up 16.09 points or 0.25% at 6567.24 Germany’s Dax dropped 0.91% to 9291.83 France’s Cac closed 0.89% lower at 4189.89 Italy’s FTSE MIB lost 0.99% to 19,095.32 Spain’s Ibex ended down 1.32% at 10,126.3 On Wall Street the Dow Jones Industrial Average is currently around 9 points or 0.06% higher after a reasonable set of non-farm payroll numbers. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.48pm16:48 Martin Wolf brings the session to an end by saying: “We don’t seem to have reached 100% consensus on all subjects” and says another symposium next year might be needed to resolve outstanding issues. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.43pm16:43 Speaking on the issue of whether the euro should have devalued, the ECB’s Benoit Coeure said that, given the large eurozone current account surplus, it was not clear that a weaker euro was the right solution to growth problems. The panel and audience at the Bank of France symposium. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.37pm16:37 Updated at 4.52pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.23pm16:23 Now to questions, and asked about fiscal policy structures, Janet Yellen said: “In thinking about fiscal policy, having a long term target for sustainable debt to GDP is important.” The IMF’s Christine Lagarde said EU fiscal goals may need a rethink and a reset, given how the situation has evolved. Updated at 4.25pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.14pm16:14 ECB board member Benoit Coeure said at the Paris symposium that eurozone leaders needed to take steps on structural reform at their December meeting. He said monetary policy should be used where possible to get inflation back to 2%. Internal devaluation within the eurozone just shifted demand around, and better productivity was needed. Janet Yellen is now up, and her full speech is available here on the Federal Reserve website. Janet Yellen in Paris Moderator Martin Wolf of the FT was having fun, by the way, when he moved from Coeure to Yellen: Updated at 4.21pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.56pm15:56 Banks were responsible for the financial crisis, says Raghuram Rajan, governor of the Reserve Bank of India at the Paris symposium, but he wondered whether regulation had now gone too far and was hurting risk taking. He said: “Banks have cried wolf too often so they have very little credibilty when they cry wolf again.” But equally they are now stepping away from risks, he said. This could harm economic growth, so a balance needed to be found. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.48pm15:48 More from Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen at the Paris symposium (from her yet to be delivered comments), courtesy Reuters: Yellen said politicians across the globe should make sure their fiscal houses are in order during good times, so they can support economies when things go bad, blaming part of the slow recovery on weak government support. Yellen said that as the financial crisis took hold in 2008, central banks were forced to turn to unconventional tools such as large-scale bond buying programs to prop up their economies. The tools helped support domestic recovery and global economic growth, but more action from fiscal authorities would have been helpful, she said. “In the United States, fiscal policy has been much less supportive relative to previous recoveries,”Yellen said. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.37pm15:37 On Europe, Lagarde said ECB president Mario Draghi’s comments that the central bank was ready to do more to stimulate the flagging eurozone economy were “perfectly legimate and appropriate.”
    1591 Posted by Rick Arrow
  • Over to Greece where government leaders are expressing optimism that the debt-stricken country is inching ever closer to exiting its EU-IMF sponsored bailout programme. From Athens our correspondent Helena Smith reports: Hours after euro area finance ministers agreed to consider throwing Greece a precautionary credit line, Athens’ deputy prime minister Evangelos Venizelos said the decision had effectively launched the country’s exit from often onerous international supervision. “The eurogroup meeting fits absolutely with our planning,” he told reporters, reiterating that the government’s aim was to strike a deal with lenders by year’s end. “The goal is to have left the regime of the memorandum and troika [oversight] and to have returned to [having] a status of essential equality in the eurozone … without emergency mechanisms such as the troika. There will be nothing better. Giving its first sign of support for Athens’ avowed aim to exit its economic adjustment programme by 2015, the euro group announced that it would begin discussions on the details of a new credit line for the twice-bailed out country late on Thursday. Tthe Greek Finance Ministry in Athens. Photo: Reuters/Alkis Konstantinidis “Taking into account the still fragile market sentiment and the many reform challenges ahead there is strong support for a precautionary credit line,” the euro group’s chairman, Jeroen Dijsselbloem, said at the session. EU aid disbursements drawn down from the €240bn bailout scheme are due to expire this year. Although the credit line could be guaranteed through the European Stability Mechanism, Dijsselbloem insisted there was “broad consensus” that the IMF remain involved in the new plan, the nuts and bolts of which are not expected to be finalized until the next euro group meeting on December 8 at the earliest. Venizelos made the statements as media reports filtered through that the vehemently anti-austerity main opposition leader, Alexis Tsipras, had requested a meeting with the new European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker. Tsipras’ radical left Syriza party has been at pains to strengthen ties with European officials amid polls that have shown it would come first if, as many expect, a snap election is held early next year. Media reports suggested that Tsipras’ request had been welcomed by Juncker who has publicly criticized the young leader’s policies in the past.The prospect of Syriza assuming power has unnerved the business community. Alexis Tsipras, leader of Greece’s Syriza party. Photo: Reuters/Yorgos Karahalis On that note, it’s time to close up for the evening. Thanks for all your comments, have a good weekend, and we’ll be back on Monday. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   5.37pm17:37 European markets end week on mixed note There was a two way pull on the market, with early gains after the ECB’s hints on Thursday of further action to help the struggling eurozone economy. But worries about further Russian incursions into Ukraine, not to mention a volatile rouble, punctured the optimism, and worries about a slowdown in the banking sector with poor loan growth did not help matters. A revival in mining shares helped keep the UK market in positive terrritory, but elsewhere the picture was more negative. The final scores showed: The FTSE 100 finished up 16.09 points or 0.25% at 6567.24 Germany’s Dax dropped 0.91% to 9291.83 France’s Cac closed 0.89% lower at 4189.89 Italy’s FTSE MIB lost 0.99% to 19,095.32 Spain’s Ibex ended down 1.32% at 10,126.3 On Wall Street the Dow Jones Industrial Average is currently around 9 points or 0.06% higher after a reasonable set of non-farm payroll numbers. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.48pm16:48 Martin Wolf brings the session to an end by saying: “We don’t seem to have reached 100% consensus on all subjects” and says another symposium next year might be needed to resolve outstanding issues. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.43pm16:43 Speaking on the issue of whether the euro should have devalued, the ECB’s Benoit Coeure said that, given the large eurozone current account surplus, it was not clear that a weaker euro was the right solution to growth problems. The panel and audience at the Bank of France symposium. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.37pm16:37 Updated at 4.52pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.23pm16:23 Now to questions, and asked about fiscal policy structures, Janet Yellen said: “In thinking about fiscal policy, having a long term target for sustainable debt to GDP is important.” The IMF’s Christine Lagarde said EU fiscal goals may need a rethink and a reset, given how the situation has evolved. Updated at 4.25pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   4.14pm16:14 ECB board member Benoit Coeure said at the Paris symposium that eurozone leaders needed to take steps on structural reform at their December meeting. He said monetary policy should be used where possible to get inflation back to 2%. Internal devaluation within the eurozone just shifted demand around, and better productivity was needed. Janet Yellen is now up, and her full speech is available here on the Federal Reserve website. Janet Yellen in Paris Moderator Martin Wolf of the FT was having fun, by the way, when he moved from Coeure to Yellen: Updated at 4.21pm GMT Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.56pm15:56 Banks were responsible for the financial crisis, says Raghuram Rajan, governor of the Reserve Bank of India at the Paris symposium, but he wondered whether regulation had now gone too far and was hurting risk taking. He said: “Banks have cried wolf too often so they have very little credibilty when they cry wolf again.” But equally they are now stepping away from risks, he said. This could harm economic growth, so a balance needed to be found. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.48pm15:48 More from Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen at the Paris symposium (from her yet to be delivered comments), courtesy Reuters: Yellen said politicians across the globe should make sure their fiscal houses are in order during good times, so they can support economies when things go bad, blaming part of the slow recovery on weak government support. Yellen said that as the financial crisis took hold in 2008, central banks were forced to turn to unconventional tools such as large-scale bond buying programs to prop up their economies. The tools helped support domestic recovery and global economic growth, but more action from fiscal authorities would have been helpful, she said. “In the United States, fiscal policy has been much less supportive relative to previous recoveries,”Yellen said. Facebook Twitter Google plus expand   3.37pm15:37 On Europe, Lagarde said ECB president Mario Draghi’s comments that the central bank was ready to do more to stimulate the flagging eurozone economy were “perfectly legimate and appropriate.”
    Nov 24, 2014 1591
  • 20 Nov 2014
    1939 Hewlett and Packard in the garage workshop courtesy HP Archives Hewlett-Packard is Founded. David Packard and Bill Hewlett found Hewlett-Packard in a Palo Alto, California garage. Their first product was the HP 200A Audio Oscillator, which rapidly becomes a popular piece of test equipment for engineers. Walt Disney Pictures ordered eight of the 200B model to use as sound effects generators for the 1940 movie “Fantasia.” 1940 The Complex Number Calculator (CNC) The Complex Number Calculator (CNC) is completed. In 1939, Bell Telephone Laboratories completed this calculator, designed by researcher George Stibitz.  In 1940, Stibitz demonstrated the CNC at an American Mathematical Society conference held at Dartmouth College.  Stibitz stunned the group by performing calculations remotely on the CNC (located in New York City) using a Teletype connected via special telephone lines. This is considered to be the first demonstration of remote access computing. 1941 The Zuse Z3 Computer Konrad Zuse finishes the Z3 computer. The Z3 was an early computer built by German engineer Konrad Zuse working in complete isolation from developments elsewhere. Using 2,300 relays, the Z3 used floating point binary arithmetic and had a 22-bit word length. The original Z3 was destroyed in a bombing raid of Berlin in late 1943. However, Zuse later supervised a reconstruction of the Z3 in the 1960s which is currently on display at the Deutsches Museum in Munich. Bombe replica, Bletchley Park, U.K. The first Bombe is completed. Based partly on the design of the Polish “Bomba,” a mechanical means of decrypting Nazi military communications during WWII, the British Bombe design was greatly influenced by the work of computer pioneer Alan Turing and others.  Many bombes were built.  Together they dramatically improved the intelligence gathering and processing capabilities of Allied forces. [Computers] 1942 The Atanasoff-Berry Computer The Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC) is completed. After successfully demonstrating a proof-of-concept prototype in 1939, Atanasoff received funds to build the full-scale machine.  Built at Iowa State College (now University), the ABC was designed and built by Professor John Vincent Atanasoff and graduate student Cliff Berry between 1939 and 1942. The ABC was at the center of a patent dispute relating to the invention of the computer, which was resolved in 1973 when it was shown that ENIAC co-designer John Mauchly had come to examine the ABC shortly after it became functional.The legal result was a landmark: Atanasoff was declared the originator of several basic computer ideas, but the computer as a concept was declared un-patentable and thus was freely open to all. This result has been referred to as the "dis-invention of the computer." A full-scale reconstruction of the ABC was completed in 1997 and proved that the ABC machine functioned as Atanasoff had claimed. 1943 Whirlwind installation at MIT Project Whirlwind begins. During World War II, the U.S. Navy approached the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) about building a flight simulator to train bomber crews. The team first built a large analog computer, but found it inaccurate and inflexible. After designers saw a demonstration of the ENIAC computer, they decided on building a digital computer. By the time the Whirlwind was completed in 1951, the Navy had lost interest in the project, though the U.S. Air Force would eventually support the project which would influence the design of the SAGE program. George Stibitz circa 1940 The Relay Interpolator is completed. The U.S. Army asked Bell Labs to design a machine to assist in testing its M-9 Gun Director. Bell Labs mathematician George Stibitz recommended using a relay-based calculator for the project. The result was the Relay Interpolator, later called the Bell Labs Model II. The Relay Interpolator used 440 relays and since it was programmable by paper tape, it was used for other applications following the war. 1944 Harvard Mark-I in use, 1944 Harvard Mark-1 is completed. Conceived by Harvard professor Howard Aiken, and designed and built by IBM, the Harvard Mark-1 was a room-sized, relay-based calculator. The machine had a fifty-foot long camshaft that synchronized the machine’s thousands of component parts. The Mark-1 was used to produce mathematical tables but was soon superseded by stored program computers. The Colossus at Work At Bletchley Park The first Colossus is operational at Bletchley Park. Designed by British engineer Tommy Flowers, the Colossus was designed to break the complex Lorenz ciphers used by the Nazis during WWII. A total of ten Colossi were delivered to Bletchley, each using 1,500 vacuum tubes and a series of pulleys transported continuous rolls of punched paper tape containing possible solutions to a particular code. Colossus reduced the time to break Lorenz messages from weeks to hours. The machine’s existence was not made public until the 1970s 1945 John von Neumann John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC" in which he outlined the architecture of a stored-program computer. Electronic storage of programming information and data eliminated the need for the more clumsy methods of programming, such as punched paper tape — a concept that has characterized mainstream computer development since 1945. Hungarian-born von Neumann demonstrated prodigious expertise in hydrodynamics, ballistics, meteorology, game theory, statistics, and the use of mechanical devices for computation. After the war, he concentrated on the development of Princeton´s Institute for Advanced Studies computer and its copies around the world. 1946 ENIAC In February, the public got its first glimpse of the ENIAC, a machine built by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert that improved by 1,000 times on the speed of its contemporaries. Start of project: 1943 Completed: 1946 Programmed: plug board and switches Speed: 5,000 operations per second Input/output: cards, lights, switches, plugs Floor space: 1,000 square feet Project leaders: John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert. AVIDAC An inspiring summer school on computing at the University of Pennsylvania´s Moore School of Electrical Engineering stimulated construction of stored-program computers at universities and research institutions. This free, public set of lectures inspired the EDSAC, BINAC, and, later, IAS machine clones like the AVIDAC. Here, Warren Kelleher completes the wiring of the arithmetic unit components of the AVIDAC at Argonne National Laboratory. Robert Dennis installs the inter-unit wiring as James Woody Jr. adjusts the deflection control circuits of the memory unit. 1948 IBM´s SSEC IBM´s Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator computed scientific data in public display near the company´s Manhattan headquarters. Before its decommissioning in 1952, the SSEC produced the moon-position tables used for plotting the course of the 1969 Apollo flight to the moon. Speed: 50 multiplications per second Input/output: cards, punched tape Memory type: punched tape, vacuum tubes, relays Technology: 20,000 relays, 12,500 vacuum tubes Floor space: 25 feet by 40 feet Project leader: Wallace Eckert 1949 Wilkes with the EDSAC Maurice Wilkes assembled the EDSAC, the first practical stored-program computer, at Cambridge University. His ideas grew out of the Moore School lectures he had attended three years earlier.For programming the EDSAC, Wilkes established a library of short programs called subroutines stored on punched paper tapes. Technology: vacuum tubes Memory: 1K words, 17 bits, mercury delay line Speed: 714 operations per second Manchester Mark I The Manchester Mark I computer functioned as a complete system using the Williams tube for memory. This University machine became the prototype for Ferranti Corp.´s first computer. Start of project: 1947 Completed: 1949 Add time: 1.8 microseconds Input/output: paper tape, teleprinter, switches Memory size: 128 + 1024 40-digit words Memory type: cathode ray tube, magnetic drum Technology: 1,300 vacuum tubes Floor space: medium room Project leaders: Frederick Williams and Tom Kilburn 1950 ERA 1101 drum memory Engineering Research Associates of Minneapolis built the ERA 1101, the first commercially produced computer; the company´s first customer was the U.S. Navy. It held 1 million bits on its magnetic drum, the earliest magnetic storage devices. Drums registered information as magnetic pulses in tracks around a metal cylinder. Read/write heads both recorded and recovered the data. Drums eventually stored as many as 4,000 words and retrieved any one of them in as little as five-thousandths of a second. SEAC The National Bureau of Standards constructed the SEAC (Standards Eastern Automatic Computer) in Washington as a laboratory for testing components and systems for setting computer standards. The SEAC was the first computer to use all-diode logic, a technology more reliable than vacuum tubes, and the first stored-program computer completed in the United States. Magnetic tape in the external storage units (shown on the right of this photo) stored programming information, coded subroutines, numerical data, and output. SWAC The National Bureau of Standards completed its SWAC (Standards Western Automatic Computer) at the Institute for Numerical Analysis in Los Angeles. Rather than testing components like its companion, the SEAC, the SWAC had an objective of computing using already-developed technology. Pilot ACE Alan Turing´s philosophy directed design of Britain´s Pilot ACE at the National Physical Laboratory. "We are trying to build a machine to do all kinds of different things simply by programming rather than by the addition of extra apparatus," Turing said at a symposium on large-scale digital calculating machinery in 1947 in Cambridge, Mass. Start of project: 1948 Completed: 1950 Add time: 1.8 microseconds Input/output: cards Memory size: 352 32-digit words Memory type: delay lines Technology: 800 vacuum tubes Floor space: 12 square feet Project leader: J. H. Wilkinson 1951 MIT Whirlwind MIT´s Whirlwind debuted on Edward R. Murrow´s "See It Now" television series. Project director Jay Forrester described the computer as a "reliable operating system," running 35 hours a week at 90-percent utility using an electrostatic tube memory. Start of project: 1945 Completed: 1951 Add time: Approx. 16 microseconds Input/output: cathode ray tube, paper tape, magnetic tape Memory size: 2048 16-digit words Memory type: cathode ray tube, magnetic drum, tape (1953 - core memory) Technology: 4,500 vacuum tubes, 14,800 diodes Floor space: 3,100 square feet Project leaders: Jay Forrester and Robert Everett LEO England´s first commercial computer, the Lyons Electronic Office, solved clerical problems. The president of Lyons Tea Co. had the computer, modeled after the EDSAC, built to solve the problem of daily scheduling production and delivery of cakes to the Lyons tea shops. After the success of the first LEO, Lyons went into business manufacturing computers to meet the growing need for data processing systems. UNIVAC I The UNIVAC I delivered to the U.S. Census Bureau was the first commercial computer to attract widespread public attention. Although manufactured by Remington Rand, the machine often was mistakenly referred to as the "IBM UNIVAC." Remington Rand eventually sold 46 machines at more than $1 million each.F.O.B. factory $750,000 plus $185,000 for a high speed printer. Speed: 1,905 operations per second Input/output: magnetic tape, unityper, printer Memory size: 1,000 12-digit words in delay lines Memory type: delay lines, magnetic tape Technology: serial vacuum tubes, delay lines, magnetic tape Floor space: 943 cubic feet Cost: F.O.B. factory $750,000 plus $185,000 for a high speed printer Project leaders: J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchly 1952 Los Alamos MANIAC John von Neumann´s IAS computer became operational at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, N.J. Contract obliged the builders to share their designs with other research institutes. This resulted in a number of clones: the MANIAC at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the ILLIAC at the University of Illinois, the Johnniac at Rand Corp., the SILLIAC in Australia, and others. 1953 IBM 701 IBM shipped its first electronic computer, the 701. During three years of production, IBM sold 19 machines to research laboratories, aircraft companies, and the federal government. 1954 IBM 650 The IBM 650 magnetic drum calculator established itself as the first mass-produced computer, with the company selling 450 in one year. Spinning at 12,500 rpm, the 650´s magnetic data-storage drum allowed much faster access to stored material than drum memory machines. 1956 MIT TX0 MIT researchers built the TX-0, the first general-purpose, programmable computer built with transistors. For easy replacement, designers placed each transistor circuit inside a "bottle," similar to a vacuum tube. Constructed at MIT´s Lincoln Laboratory, the TX-0 moved to the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics, where it hosted some early imaginative tests of programming, including a Western movie shown on TV, 3-D tic-tac-toe, and a maze in which mouse found martinis and became increasingly inebriated. 1958 SAGE operator station SAGE — Semi-Automatic Ground Environment — linked hundreds of radar stations in the United States and Canada in the first large-scale computer communications network. An operator directed actions by touching a light gun to the screen.The air defense system operated on the AN/FSQ-7 computer (known as Whirlwind II during its development at MIT) as its central computer. Each computer used a full megawatt of power to drive its 55,000 vacuum tubes, 175,000 diodes and 13,000 transistors.    Japan´s NEC built the country´s first electronic computer, the NEAC 1101. 1959 IBM STRETCH IBM´s 7000 series mainframes were the company´s first transistorized computers. At the top of the line of computers — all of which emerged significantly faster and more dependable than vacuum tube machines — sat the 7030, also known as the "Stretch." Nine of the computers, which featured a 64-bit word and other innovations, were sold to national laboratories and other scientific users. L. R. Johnson first used the term "architecture" in describing the Stretch. 1960 DEC PDP-1 The precursor to the minicomputer, DEC´s PDP-1 sold for $120,000. One of 50 built, the average PDP-1 included with a cathode ray tube graphic display, needed no air conditioning and required only one operator. It´s large scope intrigued early hackers at MIT, who wrote the first computerized video game, SpaceWar!, for it. The SpaceWar! creators then used the game as a standard demonstration on all 50 computers. 1961 IBM 1401 According to Datamation magazine, IBM had an 81.2-percent share of the computer market in 1961, the year in which it introduced the 1400 Series. The 1401 mainframe, the first in the series, replaced the vacuum tube with smaller, more reliable transistors and used a magnetic core memory.Demand called for more than 12,000 of the 1401 computers, and the machine´s success made a strong case for using general-purpose computers rather than specialized systems. 1962 Wes Clark with LINC The LINC (Laboratory Instrumentation Computer) offered the first real time laboratory data processing. Designed by Wesley Clark at Lincoln Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corp. later commercialized it as the LINC-8.Research faculty came to a workshop at MIT to build their own machines, most of which they used in biomedical studies. DEC supplied components. 1964 IBM System/360 IBM announced the System/360, a family of six mutually compatible computers and 40 peripherals that could work together. The initial investment of $5 billion was quickly returned as orders for the system climbed to 1,000 per month within two years. At the time IBM released the System/360, the company was making a transition from discrete transistors to integrated circuits, and its major source of revenue moved from punched-card equipment to electronic computer systems. CDC 6600 CDC´s 6600 supercomputer, designed by Seymour Cray, performed up to 3 million instructions per second — a processing speed three times faster than that of its closest competitor, the IBM Stretch. The 6600 retained the distinction of being the fastest computer in the world until surpassed by its successor, the CDC 7600, in 1968. Part of the speed came from the computer´s design, which had 10 small computers, known as peripheral processors, funneling data to a large central processing unit. 1965 DEC PDP-8 Digital Equipment Corp. introduced the PDP-8, the first commercially successful minicomputer. The PDP-8 sold for $18,000, one-fifth the price of a small IBM 360 mainframe. The speed, small size, and reasonable cost enabled the PDP-8 to go into thousands of manufacturing plants, small businesses, and scientific laboratories. 1966 ILLIAC IV The Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency contracted with the University of Illinois to build a large parallel processing computer, the ILLIAC IV, which did not operate until 1972 at NASA´s Ames Research Center. The first large-scale array computer, the ILLIAC IV achieved a computation speed of 200 million instructions per second, about 300 million operations per second, and 1 billion bits per second of I/O transfer via a unique combination of parallel architecture and the overlapping or "pipe-lining" structure of its 64 processing elements.This photograph shows one of the ILLIAC´s 13 Burroughs disks, the debugging computer, the central unit, and the processing unit cabinet with a processing element. HP-2115 Hewlett-Packard entered the general purpose computer business with its HP-2115 for computation, offering a computational power formerly found only in much larger computers. It supported a wide variety of languages, among them BASIC, ALGOL, and FORTRAN. 1968 Ed deCastro and Nova Data General Corp., started by a group of engineers that had left Digital Equipment Corp., introduced the Nova, with 32 kilobytes of memory, for $8,000.In the photograph, Ed deCastro, president and founder of Data General, sits with a Nova minicomputer. The simple architecture of the Nova instruction set inspired Steve Wozniak´s Apple I board eight years later. Apollo Guidance Computer The Apollo Guidance Computer made its debut orbiting the Earth on Apollo 7. A year later, it steered Apollo 11 to the lunar surface. Astronauts communicated with the computer by punching two-digit codes and the appropriate syntactic category into the display and keyboard unit. 1971 Kenbak-1 The Kenbak-1, the first personal computer, advertised for $750 in Scientific American. Designed by John V. Blankenbaker using standard medium-scale and small-scale integrated circuits, the Kenbak-1 relied on switches for input and lights for output from its 256-byte memory. In 1973, after selling only 40 machines, Kenbak Corp. closed its doors. 1972 HP-35 Hewlett-Packard announced the HP-35 as "a fast, extremely accurate electronic slide rule" with a solid-state memory similar to that of a computer. The HP-35 distinguished itself from its competitors by its ability to perform a broad variety of logarithmic and trigonometric functions, to store more intermediate solutions for later use, and to accept and display entries in a form similar to standard scientific notation. 1973 TV Typewriter The TV Typewriter, designed by Don Lancaster, provided the first display of alphanumeric information on an ordinary television set. It used $120 worth of electronics components, as outlined in the September 1973 issue of Radio Electronics. The original design included two memory boards and could generate and store 512 characters as 16 lines of 32 characters. A 90-minute cassette tape provided supplementary storage for about 100 pages of text. Micral The Micral was the earliest commercial, non-kit personal computer based on a micro-processor, the Intel 8008. Thi Truong developed the computer and Philippe Kahn the software. Truong, founder and president of the French company R2E, created the Micral as a replacement for minicomputers in situations that didn´t require high performance. Selling for $1,750, the Micral never penetrated the U.S. market. In 1979, Truong sold Micral to Bull. 1974 Xerox Alto Researchers at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center designed the Alto — the first work station with a built-in mouse for input. The Alto stored several files simultaneously in windows, offered menus and icons, and could link to a local area network. Although Xerox never sold the Alto commercially, it gave a number of them to universities. Engineers later incorporated its features into work stations and personal computers. Scelbi 8H Scelbi advertised its 8H computer, the first commercially advertised U.S. computer based on a microprocessor, Intel´s 8008. Scelbi aimed the 8H, available both in kit form and fully assembled, at scientific, electronic, and biological applications. It had 4 kilobytes of internal memory and a cassette tape, with both teletype and oscilloscope interfaces. In 1975, Scelbi introduced the 8B version with 16 kilobytes of memory for the business market. The company sold about 200 machines, losing $500 per unit. 1975 MITS Altair The January edition of Popular Electronics featured the Altair 8800 computer kit, based on Intel´s 8080 microprocessor, on its cover. Within weeks of the computer´s debut, customers inundated the manufacturing company, MITS, with orders. Bill Gates and Paul Allen licensed BASIC as the software language for the Altair. Ed Roberts invented the 8800 — which sold for $297, or $395 with a case — and coined the term "personal computer." The machine came with 256 bytes of memory (expandable to 64K) and an open 100-line bus structure that evolved into the S-100 standard. In 1977, MITS sold out to Pertec, which continued producing Altairs through 1978. Felsenstein´s VDM The visual display module (VDM) prototype, designed in 1975 by Lee Felsenstein, marked the first implementation of a memory-mapped alphanumeric video display for personal computers. Introduced at the Altair Convention in Albuquerque in March 1976, the visual display module allowed use of personal computers for interactive games. Tandem-16 Tandem computers tailored its Tandem-16, the first fault-tolerant computer, for online transaction processing. The banking industry rushed to adopt the machine, built to run during repair or expansion. 1976 Apple-1, signed by Steve Wozniak Steve Wozniak, a young American electronics expert, designed the Apple-1, a single-board computer for hobbyists. With an order for 50 assembled systems from Mountain View, California computer store The Byte Shop in hand, he and best friend Steve Jobs started a new company, naming it Apple Computer, Inc.  In all, about 200 of the boards were sold before Apple announced the follow-on Apple II a year later as a ready-to-use computer for consumers, a model which sold in the millions. Cray I The Cray I made its name as the first commercially successful vector processor. The fastest machine of its day, its speed came partly from its shape, a C, which reduced the length of wires and thus the time signals needed to travel across them. Project started: 1972 Project completed: 1976 Speed: 166 million floating-point operations per second Size: 58 cubic feet Weight: 5,300 lbs. Technology: Integrated circuit Clock rate: 83 million cycles per second Word length: 64-bit words Instruction set: 128 instructions 1977 Commodore PET The Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) — the first of several personal computers released in 1977 — came fully assembled and was straightforward to operate, with either 4 or 8 kilobytes of memory, two built-in cassette drives, and a membrane "chiclet" keyboard. Apple II The Apple II became an instant success when released in 1977 with its printed circuit motherboard, switching power supply, keyboard, case assembly, manual, game paddles, A/C powercord, and cassette tape with the computer game "Breakout." When hooked up to a color television set, the Apple II produced brilliant color graphics. TRS-80 In the first month after its release, Tandy Radio Shack´s first desktop computer — the TRS-80 — sold 10,000 units, well more than the company´s projected sales of 3,000 units for one year. Priced at $599.95, the machine included a Z80 based microprocessor, a video display, 4 kilobytes of memory, BASIC, cassette storage, and easy-to-understand manuals that assumed no prior knowledge on the part of the consumer. 1978 VAX 11/780 The VAX 11/780 from Digital Equipment Corp. featured the ability to address up to 4.3 gigabytes of virtual memory, providing hundreds of times the capacity of most minicomputers. 1979 Advertisment for Atari 400 and 800 computers Atari introduces the Model 400 and 800 Computer. Shortly after delivery of the Atari VCS game console, Atari designed two microcomputers with game capabilities: the Model 400 and Model 800. The two machines were built with the idea that the 400 would serve primarily as a game console while the 800 would be more of a home computer. Both sold well, though they had technical and marketing problems, and faced strong competition from the Apple II, Commodore PET, and TRS-80 computers. 1981    IBM introduced its PC, igniting a fast growth of the personal computer market. The first PC ran on a 4.77 MHz Intel 8088 microprocessor and used Microsoft´s MS-DOS operating system. Osborne I Adam Osborne completed the first portable computer, the Osborne I, which weighed 24 pounds and cost $1,795. The price made the machine especially attractive, as it included software worth about $1,500. The machine featured a 5-inch display, 64 kilobytes of memory, a modem, and two 5 1/4-inch floppy disk drives.In April 1981, Byte Magazine Editor in Chief Chris Morgan mentioned the Osborne I in an article on "Future Trends in Personal Computing." He wrote: "I recently had an opportunity to see the Osborne I in action. I was impressed with it´s compactness: it will fit under an airplane seat. (Adam Osborne is currently seeking approval from the FAA to operate the unit on board a plane.) One quibble: the screen may be too small for some people´s taste." Apollo DN100 Apollo Computer unveiled the first work station, its DN100, offering more power than some minicomputers at a fraction of the price. Apollo Computer and Sun Microsystems, another early entrant in the work station market, optimized their machines to run the computer-intensive graphics programs common in engineering. 1982    The Cray XMP, first produced in this year, almost doubled the operating speed of competing machines with a parallel processing system that ran at 420 million floating-point operations per second, or megaflops. Arranging two Crays to work together on different parts of the same problem achieved the faster speed. Defense and scientific research institutes also heavily used Crays. Early Publicity still for the Commodore 64 Commodore introduces the Commodore 64. The C64, as it was better known, sold for $595, came with 64KB of RAM and featured impressive graphics. Thousands of software titles were released over the lifespan of the C64. By the time the C64 was discontinued in 1993, it had sold more than 22 million units and is recognized by the 2006 Guinness Book of World Records as the greatest selling single computer model of all time. 1983    Apple introduced its Lisa. The first personal computer with a graphical user interface, its development was central in the move to such systems for personal computers. The Lisa´s sloth and high price ($10,000) led to its ultimate failure.The Lisa ran on a Motorola 68000 microprocessor and came equipped with 1 megabyte of RAM, a 12-inch black-and-white monitor, dual 5 1/4-inch floppy disk drives and a 5 megabyte Profile hard drive. The Xerox Star — which included a system called Smalltalk that involved a mouse, windows, and pop-up menus — inspired the Lisa´s designers. Compaq PC clone Compaq Computer Corp. introduced first PC clone that used the same software as the IBM PC. With the success of the clone, Compaq recorded first-year sales of $111 million, the most ever by an American business in a single year.With the introduction of its PC clone, Compaq launched a market for IBM-compatible computers that by 1996 had achieved a 83-percent share of the personal computer market. Designers reverse-engineered the Compaq clone, giving it nearly 100-percent compatibility with the IBM. 1984 Apple Macintosh Apple Computer launched the Macintosh, the first successful mouse-driven computer with a graphic user interface, with a single $1.5 million commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl. Based on the Motorola 68000 microprocessor, the Macintosh included many of the Lisa´s features at a much more affordable price: $2,500.Apple´s commercial played on the theme of George Orwell´s "1984" and featured the destruction of Big Brother with the power of personal computing found in a Macintosh. Applications that came as part of the package included MacPaint, which made use of the mouse, and MacWrite, which demonstrated WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) word processing. IBM PC Jr. IBM released its PC Jr. and PC-AT. The PC Jr. failed, but the PC-AT, several times faster than original PC and based on the Intel 80286 chip, claimed success with its notable increases in performance and storage capacity, all for about $4,000. It also included more RAM and accommodated high-density 1.2-megabyte 5 1/4-inch floppy disks. 1985 Amiga 1000 with Seiko Music Keyboard The Amiga 1000 is released. Commodore’s Amiga 1000 sold for $1,295 dollars (without monitor) and had audio and video capabilities beyond those found in most other personal computers. It developed a very loyal following and add-on components allowed it to be upgraded easily. The inside of the case is engraved with the signatures of the Amiga designers, including Jay Miner as well as the paw print of his dog Mitchy. 1986 Connection Machine Daniel Hillis of Thinking Machines Corp. moved artificial intelligence a step forward when he developed the controversial concept of massive parallelism in the Connection Machine. The machine used up to 65,536 processors and could complete several billion operations per second. Each processor had its own small memory linked with others through a flexible network that users could alter by reprogramming rather than rewiring.The machine´s system of connections and switches let processors broadcast information and requests for help to other processors in a simulation of brainlike associative recall. Using this system, the machine could work faster than any other at the time on a problem that could be parceled out among the many processors.    IBM and MIPS released the first RISC-based workstations, the PC/RT and R2000-based systems. Reduced instruction set computers grew out of the observation that the simplest 20 percent of a computer´s instruction set does 80 percent of the work, including most base operations such as add, load from memory, and store in memory.The IBM PC-RT had 1 megabyte of RAM, a 1.2-megabyte floppy disk drive, and a 40-megabyte hard drive. It performed 2 million instructions per second, but other RISC-based computers worked significantly faster. 1987 IBM PS/2 IBM introduced its PS/2 machines, which made the 3 1/2-inch floppy disk drive and video graphics array standard for IBM computers. The first IBMs to include Intel´s 80386 chip, the company had shipped more than 1 million units by the end of the year. IBM released a new operating system, OS/2, at the same time, allowing the use of a mouse with IBMs for the first time. 1988 NeXT Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, who left Apple to form his own company, unveiled the NeXT. The computer he created failed but was recognized as an important innovation. At a base price of $6,500, the NeXT ran too slowly to be popular.The significance of the NeXT rested in its place as the first personal computer to incorporate a drive for an optical storage disk, a built-in digital signal processor that allowed voice recognition, and object-oriented languages to simplify programming. The NeXT offered Motorola 68030 microprocessors, 8 megabytes of RAM, and a 256-megabyte read/write optical disk storage.
    725 Posted by Iris Lee
  • 1939 Hewlett and Packard in the garage workshop courtesy HP Archives Hewlett-Packard is Founded. David Packard and Bill Hewlett found Hewlett-Packard in a Palo Alto, California garage. Their first product was the HP 200A Audio Oscillator, which rapidly becomes a popular piece of test equipment for engineers. Walt Disney Pictures ordered eight of the 200B model to use as sound effects generators for the 1940 movie “Fantasia.” 1940 The Complex Number Calculator (CNC) The Complex Number Calculator (CNC) is completed. In 1939, Bell Telephone Laboratories completed this calculator, designed by researcher George Stibitz.  In 1940, Stibitz demonstrated the CNC at an American Mathematical Society conference held at Dartmouth College.  Stibitz stunned the group by performing calculations remotely on the CNC (located in New York City) using a Teletype connected via special telephone lines. This is considered to be the first demonstration of remote access computing. 1941 The Zuse Z3 Computer Konrad Zuse finishes the Z3 computer. The Z3 was an early computer built by German engineer Konrad Zuse working in complete isolation from developments elsewhere. Using 2,300 relays, the Z3 used floating point binary arithmetic and had a 22-bit word length. The original Z3 was destroyed in a bombing raid of Berlin in late 1943. However, Zuse later supervised a reconstruction of the Z3 in the 1960s which is currently on display at the Deutsches Museum in Munich. Bombe replica, Bletchley Park, U.K. The first Bombe is completed. Based partly on the design of the Polish “Bomba,” a mechanical means of decrypting Nazi military communications during WWII, the British Bombe design was greatly influenced by the work of computer pioneer Alan Turing and others.  Many bombes were built.  Together they dramatically improved the intelligence gathering and processing capabilities of Allied forces. [Computers] 1942 The Atanasoff-Berry Computer The Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC) is completed. After successfully demonstrating a proof-of-concept prototype in 1939, Atanasoff received funds to build the full-scale machine.  Built at Iowa State College (now University), the ABC was designed and built by Professor John Vincent Atanasoff and graduate student Cliff Berry between 1939 and 1942. The ABC was at the center of a patent dispute relating to the invention of the computer, which was resolved in 1973 when it was shown that ENIAC co-designer John Mauchly had come to examine the ABC shortly after it became functional.The legal result was a landmark: Atanasoff was declared the originator of several basic computer ideas, but the computer as a concept was declared un-patentable and thus was freely open to all. This result has been referred to as the "dis-invention of the computer." A full-scale reconstruction of the ABC was completed in 1997 and proved that the ABC machine functioned as Atanasoff had claimed. 1943 Whirlwind installation at MIT Project Whirlwind begins. During World War II, the U.S. Navy approached the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) about building a flight simulator to train bomber crews. The team first built a large analog computer, but found it inaccurate and inflexible. After designers saw a demonstration of the ENIAC computer, they decided on building a digital computer. By the time the Whirlwind was completed in 1951, the Navy had lost interest in the project, though the U.S. Air Force would eventually support the project which would influence the design of the SAGE program. George Stibitz circa 1940 The Relay Interpolator is completed. The U.S. Army asked Bell Labs to design a machine to assist in testing its M-9 Gun Director. Bell Labs mathematician George Stibitz recommended using a relay-based calculator for the project. The result was the Relay Interpolator, later called the Bell Labs Model II. The Relay Interpolator used 440 relays and since it was programmable by paper tape, it was used for other applications following the war. 1944 Harvard Mark-I in use, 1944 Harvard Mark-1 is completed. Conceived by Harvard professor Howard Aiken, and designed and built by IBM, the Harvard Mark-1 was a room-sized, relay-based calculator. The machine had a fifty-foot long camshaft that synchronized the machine’s thousands of component parts. The Mark-1 was used to produce mathematical tables but was soon superseded by stored program computers. The Colossus at Work At Bletchley Park The first Colossus is operational at Bletchley Park. Designed by British engineer Tommy Flowers, the Colossus was designed to break the complex Lorenz ciphers used by the Nazis during WWII. A total of ten Colossi were delivered to Bletchley, each using 1,500 vacuum tubes and a series of pulleys transported continuous rolls of punched paper tape containing possible solutions to a particular code. Colossus reduced the time to break Lorenz messages from weeks to hours. The machine’s existence was not made public until the 1970s 1945 John von Neumann John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC" in which he outlined the architecture of a stored-program computer. Electronic storage of programming information and data eliminated the need for the more clumsy methods of programming, such as punched paper tape — a concept that has characterized mainstream computer development since 1945. Hungarian-born von Neumann demonstrated prodigious expertise in hydrodynamics, ballistics, meteorology, game theory, statistics, and the use of mechanical devices for computation. After the war, he concentrated on the development of Princeton´s Institute for Advanced Studies computer and its copies around the world. 1946 ENIAC In February, the public got its first glimpse of the ENIAC, a machine built by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert that improved by 1,000 times on the speed of its contemporaries. Start of project: 1943 Completed: 1946 Programmed: plug board and switches Speed: 5,000 operations per second Input/output: cards, lights, switches, plugs Floor space: 1,000 square feet Project leaders: John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert. AVIDAC An inspiring summer school on computing at the University of Pennsylvania´s Moore School of Electrical Engineering stimulated construction of stored-program computers at universities and research institutions. This free, public set of lectures inspired the EDSAC, BINAC, and, later, IAS machine clones like the AVIDAC. Here, Warren Kelleher completes the wiring of the arithmetic unit components of the AVIDAC at Argonne National Laboratory. Robert Dennis installs the inter-unit wiring as James Woody Jr. adjusts the deflection control circuits of the memory unit. 1948 IBM´s SSEC IBM´s Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator computed scientific data in public display near the company´s Manhattan headquarters. Before its decommissioning in 1952, the SSEC produced the moon-position tables used for plotting the course of the 1969 Apollo flight to the moon. Speed: 50 multiplications per second Input/output: cards, punched tape Memory type: punched tape, vacuum tubes, relays Technology: 20,000 relays, 12,500 vacuum tubes Floor space: 25 feet by 40 feet Project leader: Wallace Eckert 1949 Wilkes with the EDSAC Maurice Wilkes assembled the EDSAC, the first practical stored-program computer, at Cambridge University. His ideas grew out of the Moore School lectures he had attended three years earlier.For programming the EDSAC, Wilkes established a library of short programs called subroutines stored on punched paper tapes. Technology: vacuum tubes Memory: 1K words, 17 bits, mercury delay line Speed: 714 operations per second Manchester Mark I The Manchester Mark I computer functioned as a complete system using the Williams tube for memory. This University machine became the prototype for Ferranti Corp.´s first computer. Start of project: 1947 Completed: 1949 Add time: 1.8 microseconds Input/output: paper tape, teleprinter, switches Memory size: 128 + 1024 40-digit words Memory type: cathode ray tube, magnetic drum Technology: 1,300 vacuum tubes Floor space: medium room Project leaders: Frederick Williams and Tom Kilburn 1950 ERA 1101 drum memory Engineering Research Associates of Minneapolis built the ERA 1101, the first commercially produced computer; the company´s first customer was the U.S. Navy. It held 1 million bits on its magnetic drum, the earliest magnetic storage devices. Drums registered information as magnetic pulses in tracks around a metal cylinder. Read/write heads both recorded and recovered the data. Drums eventually stored as many as 4,000 words and retrieved any one of them in as little as five-thousandths of a second. SEAC The National Bureau of Standards constructed the SEAC (Standards Eastern Automatic Computer) in Washington as a laboratory for testing components and systems for setting computer standards. The SEAC was the first computer to use all-diode logic, a technology more reliable than vacuum tubes, and the first stored-program computer completed in the United States. Magnetic tape in the external storage units (shown on the right of this photo) stored programming information, coded subroutines, numerical data, and output. SWAC The National Bureau of Standards completed its SWAC (Standards Western Automatic Computer) at the Institute for Numerical Analysis in Los Angeles. Rather than testing components like its companion, the SEAC, the SWAC had an objective of computing using already-developed technology. Pilot ACE Alan Turing´s philosophy directed design of Britain´s Pilot ACE at the National Physical Laboratory. "We are trying to build a machine to do all kinds of different things simply by programming rather than by the addition of extra apparatus," Turing said at a symposium on large-scale digital calculating machinery in 1947 in Cambridge, Mass. Start of project: 1948 Completed: 1950 Add time: 1.8 microseconds Input/output: cards Memory size: 352 32-digit words Memory type: delay lines Technology: 800 vacuum tubes Floor space: 12 square feet Project leader: J. H. Wilkinson 1951 MIT Whirlwind MIT´s Whirlwind debuted on Edward R. Murrow´s "See It Now" television series. Project director Jay Forrester described the computer as a "reliable operating system," running 35 hours a week at 90-percent utility using an electrostatic tube memory. Start of project: 1945 Completed: 1951 Add time: Approx. 16 microseconds Input/output: cathode ray tube, paper tape, magnetic tape Memory size: 2048 16-digit words Memory type: cathode ray tube, magnetic drum, tape (1953 - core memory) Technology: 4,500 vacuum tubes, 14,800 diodes Floor space: 3,100 square feet Project leaders: Jay Forrester and Robert Everett LEO England´s first commercial computer, the Lyons Electronic Office, solved clerical problems. The president of Lyons Tea Co. had the computer, modeled after the EDSAC, built to solve the problem of daily scheduling production and delivery of cakes to the Lyons tea shops. After the success of the first LEO, Lyons went into business manufacturing computers to meet the growing need for data processing systems. UNIVAC I The UNIVAC I delivered to the U.S. Census Bureau was the first commercial computer to attract widespread public attention. Although manufactured by Remington Rand, the machine often was mistakenly referred to as the "IBM UNIVAC." Remington Rand eventually sold 46 machines at more than $1 million each.F.O.B. factory $750,000 plus $185,000 for a high speed printer. Speed: 1,905 operations per second Input/output: magnetic tape, unityper, printer Memory size: 1,000 12-digit words in delay lines Memory type: delay lines, magnetic tape Technology: serial vacuum tubes, delay lines, magnetic tape Floor space: 943 cubic feet Cost: F.O.B. factory $750,000 plus $185,000 for a high speed printer Project leaders: J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchly 1952 Los Alamos MANIAC John von Neumann´s IAS computer became operational at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, N.J. Contract obliged the builders to share their designs with other research institutes. This resulted in a number of clones: the MANIAC at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the ILLIAC at the University of Illinois, the Johnniac at Rand Corp., the SILLIAC in Australia, and others. 1953 IBM 701 IBM shipped its first electronic computer, the 701. During three years of production, IBM sold 19 machines to research laboratories, aircraft companies, and the federal government. 1954 IBM 650 The IBM 650 magnetic drum calculator established itself as the first mass-produced computer, with the company selling 450 in one year. Spinning at 12,500 rpm, the 650´s magnetic data-storage drum allowed much faster access to stored material than drum memory machines. 1956 MIT TX0 MIT researchers built the TX-0, the first general-purpose, programmable computer built with transistors. For easy replacement, designers placed each transistor circuit inside a "bottle," similar to a vacuum tube. Constructed at MIT´s Lincoln Laboratory, the TX-0 moved to the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics, where it hosted some early imaginative tests of programming, including a Western movie shown on TV, 3-D tic-tac-toe, and a maze in which mouse found martinis and became increasingly inebriated. 1958 SAGE operator station SAGE — Semi-Automatic Ground Environment — linked hundreds of radar stations in the United States and Canada in the first large-scale computer communications network. An operator directed actions by touching a light gun to the screen.The air defense system operated on the AN/FSQ-7 computer (known as Whirlwind II during its development at MIT) as its central computer. Each computer used a full megawatt of power to drive its 55,000 vacuum tubes, 175,000 diodes and 13,000 transistors.    Japan´s NEC built the country´s first electronic computer, the NEAC 1101. 1959 IBM STRETCH IBM´s 7000 series mainframes were the company´s first transistorized computers. At the top of the line of computers — all of which emerged significantly faster and more dependable than vacuum tube machines — sat the 7030, also known as the "Stretch." Nine of the computers, which featured a 64-bit word and other innovations, were sold to national laboratories and other scientific users. L. R. Johnson first used the term "architecture" in describing the Stretch. 1960 DEC PDP-1 The precursor to the minicomputer, DEC´s PDP-1 sold for $120,000. One of 50 built, the average PDP-1 included with a cathode ray tube graphic display, needed no air conditioning and required only one operator. It´s large scope intrigued early hackers at MIT, who wrote the first computerized video game, SpaceWar!, for it. The SpaceWar! creators then used the game as a standard demonstration on all 50 computers. 1961 IBM 1401 According to Datamation magazine, IBM had an 81.2-percent share of the computer market in 1961, the year in which it introduced the 1400 Series. The 1401 mainframe, the first in the series, replaced the vacuum tube with smaller, more reliable transistors and used a magnetic core memory.Demand called for more than 12,000 of the 1401 computers, and the machine´s success made a strong case for using general-purpose computers rather than specialized systems. 1962 Wes Clark with LINC The LINC (Laboratory Instrumentation Computer) offered the first real time laboratory data processing. Designed by Wesley Clark at Lincoln Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corp. later commercialized it as the LINC-8.Research faculty came to a workshop at MIT to build their own machines, most of which they used in biomedical studies. DEC supplied components. 1964 IBM System/360 IBM announced the System/360, a family of six mutually compatible computers and 40 peripherals that could work together. The initial investment of $5 billion was quickly returned as orders for the system climbed to 1,000 per month within two years. At the time IBM released the System/360, the company was making a transition from discrete transistors to integrated circuits, and its major source of revenue moved from punched-card equipment to electronic computer systems. CDC 6600 CDC´s 6600 supercomputer, designed by Seymour Cray, performed up to 3 million instructions per second — a processing speed three times faster than that of its closest competitor, the IBM Stretch. The 6600 retained the distinction of being the fastest computer in the world until surpassed by its successor, the CDC 7600, in 1968. Part of the speed came from the computer´s design, which had 10 small computers, known as peripheral processors, funneling data to a large central processing unit. 1965 DEC PDP-8 Digital Equipment Corp. introduced the PDP-8, the first commercially successful minicomputer. The PDP-8 sold for $18,000, one-fifth the price of a small IBM 360 mainframe. The speed, small size, and reasonable cost enabled the PDP-8 to go into thousands of manufacturing plants, small businesses, and scientific laboratories. 1966 ILLIAC IV The Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency contracted with the University of Illinois to build a large parallel processing computer, the ILLIAC IV, which did not operate until 1972 at NASA´s Ames Research Center. The first large-scale array computer, the ILLIAC IV achieved a computation speed of 200 million instructions per second, about 300 million operations per second, and 1 billion bits per second of I/O transfer via a unique combination of parallel architecture and the overlapping or "pipe-lining" structure of its 64 processing elements.This photograph shows one of the ILLIAC´s 13 Burroughs disks, the debugging computer, the central unit, and the processing unit cabinet with a processing element. HP-2115 Hewlett-Packard entered the general purpose computer business with its HP-2115 for computation, offering a computational power formerly found only in much larger computers. It supported a wide variety of languages, among them BASIC, ALGOL, and FORTRAN. 1968 Ed deCastro and Nova Data General Corp., started by a group of engineers that had left Digital Equipment Corp., introduced the Nova, with 32 kilobytes of memory, for $8,000.In the photograph, Ed deCastro, president and founder of Data General, sits with a Nova minicomputer. The simple architecture of the Nova instruction set inspired Steve Wozniak´s Apple I board eight years later. Apollo Guidance Computer The Apollo Guidance Computer made its debut orbiting the Earth on Apollo 7. A year later, it steered Apollo 11 to the lunar surface. Astronauts communicated with the computer by punching two-digit codes and the appropriate syntactic category into the display and keyboard unit. 1971 Kenbak-1 The Kenbak-1, the first personal computer, advertised for $750 in Scientific American. Designed by John V. Blankenbaker using standard medium-scale and small-scale integrated circuits, the Kenbak-1 relied on switches for input and lights for output from its 256-byte memory. In 1973, after selling only 40 machines, Kenbak Corp. closed its doors. 1972 HP-35 Hewlett-Packard announced the HP-35 as "a fast, extremely accurate electronic slide rule" with a solid-state memory similar to that of a computer. The HP-35 distinguished itself from its competitors by its ability to perform a broad variety of logarithmic and trigonometric functions, to store more intermediate solutions for later use, and to accept and display entries in a form similar to standard scientific notation. 1973 TV Typewriter The TV Typewriter, designed by Don Lancaster, provided the first display of alphanumeric information on an ordinary television set. It used $120 worth of electronics components, as outlined in the September 1973 issue of Radio Electronics. The original design included two memory boards and could generate and store 512 characters as 16 lines of 32 characters. A 90-minute cassette tape provided supplementary storage for about 100 pages of text. Micral The Micral was the earliest commercial, non-kit personal computer based on a micro-processor, the Intel 8008. Thi Truong developed the computer and Philippe Kahn the software. Truong, founder and president of the French company R2E, created the Micral as a replacement for minicomputers in situations that didn´t require high performance. Selling for $1,750, the Micral never penetrated the U.S. market. In 1979, Truong sold Micral to Bull. 1974 Xerox Alto Researchers at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center designed the Alto — the first work station with a built-in mouse for input. The Alto stored several files simultaneously in windows, offered menus and icons, and could link to a local area network. Although Xerox never sold the Alto commercially, it gave a number of them to universities. Engineers later incorporated its features into work stations and personal computers. Scelbi 8H Scelbi advertised its 8H computer, the first commercially advertised U.S. computer based on a microprocessor, Intel´s 8008. Scelbi aimed the 8H, available both in kit form and fully assembled, at scientific, electronic, and biological applications. It had 4 kilobytes of internal memory and a cassette tape, with both teletype and oscilloscope interfaces. In 1975, Scelbi introduced the 8B version with 16 kilobytes of memory for the business market. The company sold about 200 machines, losing $500 per unit. 1975 MITS Altair The January edition of Popular Electronics featured the Altair 8800 computer kit, based on Intel´s 8080 microprocessor, on its cover. Within weeks of the computer´s debut, customers inundated the manufacturing company, MITS, with orders. Bill Gates and Paul Allen licensed BASIC as the software language for the Altair. Ed Roberts invented the 8800 — which sold for $297, or $395 with a case — and coined the term "personal computer." The machine came with 256 bytes of memory (expandable to 64K) and an open 100-line bus structure that evolved into the S-100 standard. In 1977, MITS sold out to Pertec, which continued producing Altairs through 1978. Felsenstein´s VDM The visual display module (VDM) prototype, designed in 1975 by Lee Felsenstein, marked the first implementation of a memory-mapped alphanumeric video display for personal computers. Introduced at the Altair Convention in Albuquerque in March 1976, the visual display module allowed use of personal computers for interactive games. Tandem-16 Tandem computers tailored its Tandem-16, the first fault-tolerant computer, for online transaction processing. The banking industry rushed to adopt the machine, built to run during repair or expansion. 1976 Apple-1, signed by Steve Wozniak Steve Wozniak, a young American electronics expert, designed the Apple-1, a single-board computer for hobbyists. With an order for 50 assembled systems from Mountain View, California computer store The Byte Shop in hand, he and best friend Steve Jobs started a new company, naming it Apple Computer, Inc.  In all, about 200 of the boards were sold before Apple announced the follow-on Apple II a year later as a ready-to-use computer for consumers, a model which sold in the millions. Cray I The Cray I made its name as the first commercially successful vector processor. The fastest machine of its day, its speed came partly from its shape, a C, which reduced the length of wires and thus the time signals needed to travel across them. Project started: 1972 Project completed: 1976 Speed: 166 million floating-point operations per second Size: 58 cubic feet Weight: 5,300 lbs. Technology: Integrated circuit Clock rate: 83 million cycles per second Word length: 64-bit words Instruction set: 128 instructions 1977 Commodore PET The Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) — the first of several personal computers released in 1977 — came fully assembled and was straightforward to operate, with either 4 or 8 kilobytes of memory, two built-in cassette drives, and a membrane "chiclet" keyboard. Apple II The Apple II became an instant success when released in 1977 with its printed circuit motherboard, switching power supply, keyboard, case assembly, manual, game paddles, A/C powercord, and cassette tape with the computer game "Breakout." When hooked up to a color television set, the Apple II produced brilliant color graphics. TRS-80 In the first month after its release, Tandy Radio Shack´s first desktop computer — the TRS-80 — sold 10,000 units, well more than the company´s projected sales of 3,000 units for one year. Priced at $599.95, the machine included a Z80 based microprocessor, a video display, 4 kilobytes of memory, BASIC, cassette storage, and easy-to-understand manuals that assumed no prior knowledge on the part of the consumer. 1978 VAX 11/780 The VAX 11/780 from Digital Equipment Corp. featured the ability to address up to 4.3 gigabytes of virtual memory, providing hundreds of times the capacity of most minicomputers. 1979 Advertisment for Atari 400 and 800 computers Atari introduces the Model 400 and 800 Computer. Shortly after delivery of the Atari VCS game console, Atari designed two microcomputers with game capabilities: the Model 400 and Model 800. The two machines were built with the idea that the 400 would serve primarily as a game console while the 800 would be more of a home computer. Both sold well, though they had technical and marketing problems, and faced strong competition from the Apple II, Commodore PET, and TRS-80 computers. 1981    IBM introduced its PC, igniting a fast growth of the personal computer market. The first PC ran on a 4.77 MHz Intel 8088 microprocessor and used Microsoft´s MS-DOS operating system. Osborne I Adam Osborne completed the first portable computer, the Osborne I, which weighed 24 pounds and cost $1,795. The price made the machine especially attractive, as it included software worth about $1,500. The machine featured a 5-inch display, 64 kilobytes of memory, a modem, and two 5 1/4-inch floppy disk drives.In April 1981, Byte Magazine Editor in Chief Chris Morgan mentioned the Osborne I in an article on "Future Trends in Personal Computing." He wrote: "I recently had an opportunity to see the Osborne I in action. I was impressed with it´s compactness: it will fit under an airplane seat. (Adam Osborne is currently seeking approval from the FAA to operate the unit on board a plane.) One quibble: the screen may be too small for some people´s taste." Apollo DN100 Apollo Computer unveiled the first work station, its DN100, offering more power than some minicomputers at a fraction of the price. Apollo Computer and Sun Microsystems, another early entrant in the work station market, optimized their machines to run the computer-intensive graphics programs common in engineering. 1982    The Cray XMP, first produced in this year, almost doubled the operating speed of competing machines with a parallel processing system that ran at 420 million floating-point operations per second, or megaflops. Arranging two Crays to work together on different parts of the same problem achieved the faster speed. Defense and scientific research institutes also heavily used Crays. Early Publicity still for the Commodore 64 Commodore introduces the Commodore 64. The C64, as it was better known, sold for $595, came with 64KB of RAM and featured impressive graphics. Thousands of software titles were released over the lifespan of the C64. By the time the C64 was discontinued in 1993, it had sold more than 22 million units and is recognized by the 2006 Guinness Book of World Records as the greatest selling single computer model of all time. 1983    Apple introduced its Lisa. The first personal computer with a graphical user interface, its development was central in the move to such systems for personal computers. The Lisa´s sloth and high price ($10,000) led to its ultimate failure.The Lisa ran on a Motorola 68000 microprocessor and came equipped with 1 megabyte of RAM, a 12-inch black-and-white monitor, dual 5 1/4-inch floppy disk drives and a 5 megabyte Profile hard drive. The Xerox Star — which included a system called Smalltalk that involved a mouse, windows, and pop-up menus — inspired the Lisa´s designers. Compaq PC clone Compaq Computer Corp. introduced first PC clone that used the same software as the IBM PC. With the success of the clone, Compaq recorded first-year sales of $111 million, the most ever by an American business in a single year.With the introduction of its PC clone, Compaq launched a market for IBM-compatible computers that by 1996 had achieved a 83-percent share of the personal computer market. Designers reverse-engineered the Compaq clone, giving it nearly 100-percent compatibility with the IBM. 1984 Apple Macintosh Apple Computer launched the Macintosh, the first successful mouse-driven computer with a graphic user interface, with a single $1.5 million commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl. Based on the Motorola 68000 microprocessor, the Macintosh included many of the Lisa´s features at a much more affordable price: $2,500.Apple´s commercial played on the theme of George Orwell´s "1984" and featured the destruction of Big Brother with the power of personal computing found in a Macintosh. Applications that came as part of the package included MacPaint, which made use of the mouse, and MacWrite, which demonstrated WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) word processing. IBM PC Jr. IBM released its PC Jr. and PC-AT. The PC Jr. failed, but the PC-AT, several times faster than original PC and based on the Intel 80286 chip, claimed success with its notable increases in performance and storage capacity, all for about $4,000. It also included more RAM and accommodated high-density 1.2-megabyte 5 1/4-inch floppy disks. 1985 Amiga 1000 with Seiko Music Keyboard The Amiga 1000 is released. Commodore’s Amiga 1000 sold for $1,295 dollars (without monitor) and had audio and video capabilities beyond those found in most other personal computers. It developed a very loyal following and add-on components allowed it to be upgraded easily. The inside of the case is engraved with the signatures of the Amiga designers, including Jay Miner as well as the paw print of his dog Mitchy. 1986 Connection Machine Daniel Hillis of Thinking Machines Corp. moved artificial intelligence a step forward when he developed the controversial concept of massive parallelism in the Connection Machine. The machine used up to 65,536 processors and could complete several billion operations per second. Each processor had its own small memory linked with others through a flexible network that users could alter by reprogramming rather than rewiring.The machine´s system of connections and switches let processors broadcast information and requests for help to other processors in a simulation of brainlike associative recall. Using this system, the machine could work faster than any other at the time on a problem that could be parceled out among the many processors.    IBM and MIPS released the first RISC-based workstations, the PC/RT and R2000-based systems. Reduced instruction set computers grew out of the observation that the simplest 20 percent of a computer´s instruction set does 80 percent of the work, including most base operations such as add, load from memory, and store in memory.The IBM PC-RT had 1 megabyte of RAM, a 1.2-megabyte floppy disk drive, and a 40-megabyte hard drive. It performed 2 million instructions per second, but other RISC-based computers worked significantly faster. 1987 IBM PS/2 IBM introduced its PS/2 machines, which made the 3 1/2-inch floppy disk drive and video graphics array standard for IBM computers. The first IBMs to include Intel´s 80386 chip, the company had shipped more than 1 million units by the end of the year. IBM released a new operating system, OS/2, at the same time, allowing the use of a mouse with IBMs for the first time. 1988 NeXT Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, who left Apple to form his own company, unveiled the NeXT. The computer he created failed but was recognized as an important innovation. At a base price of $6,500, the NeXT ran too slowly to be popular.The significance of the NeXT rested in its place as the first personal computer to incorporate a drive for an optical storage disk, a built-in digital signal processor that allowed voice recognition, and object-oriented languages to simplify programming. The NeXT offered Motorola 68030 microprocessors, 8 megabytes of RAM, and a 256-megabyte read/write optical disk storage.
    Nov 20, 2014 725
  • 14 Nov 2014
    Feel lonely and weak when stay at home alone  
    541 Posted by Coca Cola
  • Feel lonely and weak when stay at home alone  
    Nov 14, 2014 541

Most Viewed Blogs

  • 06 Aug 2014
    Park Bo Young - người đẹp được mệnh danh là "thiên thần điện ảnh" thuần khiết xứ Hàn - đã có mặt tại buổi họp báo sự kiện Lớp Học Làm Phim Toto. Sau khi đáp chuyến bay đến TP.HCM vào ngày hôm qua, chiều nay - 12/6, thiên thần điện ảnh thuần khiết nhất xứ Hàn - Park Bo Young đã có mặt trong buổi họp báo sự kiện Lớp Học Làm Phim Toto, chính thức ra mắt truyền thông Việt Nam. Nữ diễn viên vẫn giữ phong cách giản dị, trong sáng và thái độ thân thiện như ấn tượng ban đầu ở sân bay.   Park Bo Young diện trang phục đơn giản Park Bo Young hôm nay diện một "cây" trắng tinh khôi, make up nhẹ nhàng. Cô nàng ngay khi bước vào đã liên tục cúi chào các khách mời. Vóc dáng nhỏ nhắn kết hợp với hành động lịch sự, chân thành của Park Bo Young ngay lập tức ghi điểm tuyệt đối. Vẻ ngoài tươi tắn củaPark Bo Young   Khi được MC đề nghị tự giới thiệu về mình, Park Bo Young đã hăng hái "khoe" mình đã chuẩn bị phần giới thiệu bằng tiếng Việt rồi. Tuy nhiên do quá hồi hộp trước sự đón tiếp nồng nhiệt của truyền thông Việt Nam, sau khi nói "Xin chào", Park Bo Young đã ngây người vì... quên bài. MC và các phóng viên vui vẻ nhắc bài cho cô "Tôi là..." nhưng Park Bo Young đã ngay lập tức nói một câu tiếng Việt ngọt ngào hơn nhiều: "Tôi yêu các bạn!" và kết thúc bằng "Xin cảm ơn". Trước khi bước về chỗ ngồi, Park Bo Young lại không ngừng cúi chào mọi người đầy lễ phép.   Cô rất nhiệt tình giao lưu
    10353 Posted by Hiep Pham Duc
  • Park Bo Young - người đẹp được mệnh danh là "thiên thần điện ảnh" thuần khiết xứ Hàn - đã có mặt tại buổi họp báo sự kiện Lớp Học Làm Phim Toto. Sau khi đáp chuyến bay đến TP.HCM vào ngày hôm qua, chiều nay - 12/6, thiên thần điện ảnh thuần khiết nhất xứ Hàn - Park Bo Young đã có mặt trong buổi họp báo sự kiện Lớp Học Làm Phim Toto, chính thức ra mắt truyền thông Việt Nam. Nữ diễn viên vẫn giữ phong cách giản dị, trong sáng và thái độ thân thiện như ấn tượng ban đầu ở sân bay.   Park Bo Young diện trang phục đơn giản Park Bo Young hôm nay diện một "cây" trắng tinh khôi, make up nhẹ nhàng. Cô nàng ngay khi bước vào đã liên tục cúi chào các khách mời. Vóc dáng nhỏ nhắn kết hợp với hành động lịch sự, chân thành của Park Bo Young ngay lập tức ghi điểm tuyệt đối. Vẻ ngoài tươi tắn củaPark Bo Young   Khi được MC đề nghị tự giới thiệu về mình, Park Bo Young đã hăng hái "khoe" mình đã chuẩn bị phần giới thiệu bằng tiếng Việt rồi. Tuy nhiên do quá hồi hộp trước sự đón tiếp nồng nhiệt của truyền thông Việt Nam, sau khi nói "Xin chào", Park Bo Young đã ngây người vì... quên bài. MC và các phóng viên vui vẻ nhắc bài cho cô "Tôi là..." nhưng Park Bo Young đã ngay lập tức nói một câu tiếng Việt ngọt ngào hơn nhiều: "Tôi yêu các bạn!" và kết thúc bằng "Xin cảm ơn". Trước khi bước về chỗ ngồi, Park Bo Young lại không ngừng cúi chào mọi người đầy lễ phép.   Cô rất nhiệt tình giao lưu
    Aug 06, 2014 10353
  • 16 Apr 2015
          Bạn cần chuẩn bị những nguyên liệu sau để làm món cơm cháy - kho quẹt: - 100g thịt mỡ. Có thể dùng mỡ hoàn toàn, hoặc dùng thịt ba rọi chỗ nhiều mỡ - 50g tôm khô - 2 thìa đường - 3 thìa mắm - Vài củ hành tím, vài trái ớt - Rau củ để luộc thì tùy theo mùa và vùng miền. 1. Làm kho quẹt: Thịt mỡ rửa sạch thái hạt lựu nhỏ,   Tôm khô ngâm mềm, Cho thịt mỡ vào chảo   Thắng cho ra mỡ   Vớt phần tóp mỡ để riêng. Phần mỡ nước nếu nhiều quá thì chắt bớt ra, để lại khoảng 2-3 thìa phở dùng làm kho quẹt. Hành củ xắt lát mỏng.   Ớt xanh ớt đỏ thái nhỏ. Cho hành vào chảo mỡ, phi thơm.   Tiếp theo cho tôm vào, đảo săn. Cho nước mắm và đường vao, có thể thêm một chút nước lọc để giảm bớt độ mặn (nhưng kho quẹt đúng điệu thì phải mặn hơn bình thường một chút). Đun kho quẹt liu riu một lúc thì cho ớt và tóp mỡ vào, đun thêm một chút nữa là được. Sở dĩ mình cho tóp mỡ vào sau cùng, vì muốn ăn tóp mỡ giòn. Bạn có thể cho tóp mỡ vào cùng tôm ngay từ đầu cũng được nhé. Sau khi đun thì kho quẹt cạn bớt nước và keo lại, lúc này tắt bếp, rắc thêm chút tiêu bột là xong. 2. Làm cơm cháy: Cơm tẻ trộn với 1 xíu dầu ăn và gia vị hoặc nước mắm, Cho cơm vào chảo, thêm chút xíu nước, đậy vung đun mềm rồi dàn mỏng. Sau khi dàn mỏng, thỉnh thoảng rưới vào 1 thìa nước, (nghe xèo xèo rất vui tai) rồi lại ấn ấn cho hạt cơm liên kết với nhau. Cho nước khoảng 3-4 lần như thế thì mặt cơm sẽ vàng, lật sang mặt kia, làm tương tự. Nếu cơm được nấu bằng gạo dẻo thì không cần trộn gia vị, cũng không cần thêm nước khi làm cơm cháy vì hạt cơm mềm, dễ dàng dính với nhau. 3. Luộc rau: Đun nước trong một nồi tương đối rộng để rau được chìm hoàn toàn trong nước thoải mái và không chật chội. Khi nước sôi, thả vào một nhúm muối tinh. Sau đó, luộc từng loại rau, chín thì vớt ra, rồi cho loại khác vào. Chú ý, giữ lửa sao cho nước lúc nào cũng sôi mạnh, trùm kín hết rau, và rau không quá chật Với các loại rau có màu xanh như là rau cải, đậu cove, để giữ được màu xanh không bị xỉn thì ngay khi vớt rau ra thì thả ngay vào tô nước lạnh. Kho quẹt là món ăn có xuất xứ từ miền Nam, vốn là món ăn của những người dân nghèo để chấm cùng rau củ cho đậm đà. Ngày nay nó được biết đến và yêu thích trong rất nhiều nhà hàng và đã xuất hiện rất nhiều biến tấu cho món kho quẹt giản dị, trong đó cách làm kho quẹt được giới thiệu trong bài viết này là một kiểu khá phổ biến.    Ngoài ra thay vì chỉ ăn kèm rau củ luộc giản dị thì bạn có thể làm thêm cơm cháy chấm cùng cũng rất hợp vị, nhất là trong những ngày trời lạnh được chấm miếng cơm cháy giòn rụm vào nồi kho quẹt đậm đà cay thơm thì còn gì bằng!
    7078 Posted by YouNet Company
  •       Bạn cần chuẩn bị những nguyên liệu sau để làm món cơm cháy - kho quẹt: - 100g thịt mỡ. Có thể dùng mỡ hoàn toàn, hoặc dùng thịt ba rọi chỗ nhiều mỡ - 50g tôm khô - 2 thìa đường - 3 thìa mắm - Vài củ hành tím, vài trái ớt - Rau củ để luộc thì tùy theo mùa và vùng miền. 1. Làm kho quẹt: Thịt mỡ rửa sạch thái hạt lựu nhỏ,   Tôm khô ngâm mềm, Cho thịt mỡ vào chảo   Thắng cho ra mỡ   Vớt phần tóp mỡ để riêng. Phần mỡ nước nếu nhiều quá thì chắt bớt ra, để lại khoảng 2-3 thìa phở dùng làm kho quẹt. Hành củ xắt lát mỏng.   Ớt xanh ớt đỏ thái nhỏ. Cho hành vào chảo mỡ, phi thơm.   Tiếp theo cho tôm vào, đảo săn. Cho nước mắm và đường vao, có thể thêm một chút nước lọc để giảm bớt độ mặn (nhưng kho quẹt đúng điệu thì phải mặn hơn bình thường một chút). Đun kho quẹt liu riu một lúc thì cho ớt và tóp mỡ vào, đun thêm một chút nữa là được. Sở dĩ mình cho tóp mỡ vào sau cùng, vì muốn ăn tóp mỡ giòn. Bạn có thể cho tóp mỡ vào cùng tôm ngay từ đầu cũng được nhé. Sau khi đun thì kho quẹt cạn bớt nước và keo lại, lúc này tắt bếp, rắc thêm chút tiêu bột là xong. 2. Làm cơm cháy: Cơm tẻ trộn với 1 xíu dầu ăn và gia vị hoặc nước mắm, Cho cơm vào chảo, thêm chút xíu nước, đậy vung đun mềm rồi dàn mỏng. Sau khi dàn mỏng, thỉnh thoảng rưới vào 1 thìa nước, (nghe xèo xèo rất vui tai) rồi lại ấn ấn cho hạt cơm liên kết với nhau. Cho nước khoảng 3-4 lần như thế thì mặt cơm sẽ vàng, lật sang mặt kia, làm tương tự. Nếu cơm được nấu bằng gạo dẻo thì không cần trộn gia vị, cũng không cần thêm nước khi làm cơm cháy vì hạt cơm mềm, dễ dàng dính với nhau. 3. Luộc rau: Đun nước trong một nồi tương đối rộng để rau được chìm hoàn toàn trong nước thoải mái và không chật chội. Khi nước sôi, thả vào một nhúm muối tinh. Sau đó, luộc từng loại rau, chín thì vớt ra, rồi cho loại khác vào. Chú ý, giữ lửa sao cho nước lúc nào cũng sôi mạnh, trùm kín hết rau, và rau không quá chật Với các loại rau có màu xanh như là rau cải, đậu cove, để giữ được màu xanh không bị xỉn thì ngay khi vớt rau ra thì thả ngay vào tô nước lạnh. Kho quẹt là món ăn có xuất xứ từ miền Nam, vốn là món ăn của những người dân nghèo để chấm cùng rau củ cho đậm đà. Ngày nay nó được biết đến và yêu thích trong rất nhiều nhà hàng và đã xuất hiện rất nhiều biến tấu cho món kho quẹt giản dị, trong đó cách làm kho quẹt được giới thiệu trong bài viết này là một kiểu khá phổ biến.    Ngoài ra thay vì chỉ ăn kèm rau củ luộc giản dị thì bạn có thể làm thêm cơm cháy chấm cùng cũng rất hợp vị, nhất là trong những ngày trời lạnh được chấm miếng cơm cháy giòn rụm vào nồi kho quẹt đậm đà cay thơm thì còn gì bằng!
    Apr 16, 2015 7078
  • 17 Jun 2016
    Your Apple Watch is about to get the nearest thing to a brain transplant this fall. Apple’s watchOS 3, (announced on Monday at WWDC 2016) represents a fundamental rethinking of Apple’s only wearable. It's a concerted effort to clarify the sometimes confusing navigation, stop trying to control everything and to acknowledge that clever doesn't always equal useful.   SEE ALSO: The Apple Watch's iconic app screen isn't dead, but it is getting demoted "" name="google_ads_iframe_/6692/mash.as/inlinevideoseealso_0" width="1" height="1" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"> It's not that Apple Watch wasn't already a very good wearable device. But, for most people, the utility had narrowed down to notifications, reminders to stand-up and regular alerts about your level of activity ("Look, I closed a ring!"). Watch OS 2.0, which arrived late last year, added important features like third-party complications, HomeKit device access and, of course, access to native hardware for third-party apps. However, that last update also revealed a major weakness: These apps simply couldn’t load fast enough. Pre-loading oft-used apps in memory, as watchOS 3 promises to do, is going to make a major difference on that front, but I think it's some of the other upcoming watchOS 3 changes that will have the biggest impact on Apple Watch's overall utility.   A fresh face In some small ways, Apple Watch is becoming a bit more like the iPhone, meaning that watchOS is inheriting the best parts of iOS. A swipe up from the bottom of the watch will now reveal a control panel, just like on the iPhone. The Dock, which reveals cards of your most-used apps, looks a bit like the apps screen you get when you double-press the iPhone’s Touch ID button. (A swipe down from the top still gives access to notifications, something Apple got right with the Apple Watch from day one.) But there are even bigger, more fundamental and strategic changes. As my colleague Raymond Wong has noted thoroughly, a number of key functions, for instance, have been demoted or recast.       The Apple Watch home screen and its lovely cluster of app bubbles becomes an artifact of a failed user interface experiment. You’ll still be able to access it, but only when you press the digital crown. The Friends Circle that used to come up when you pressed the side button is dead, but the digital touches it encouraged (drawing, sending heartbeats) will have a new life in the much more powerful and cohesive iOS message system. Take Scribble, which turns finger swiping into drawings or handwriting. Scribble is now more or less the same between Apple mobile devices, but there's an extra wrinkle in watchOS 3: It will let you write an custom message one letter at at time — for those instances were the boilerplate responses aren't enough. (In my experience, they were almost never the ones I needed.)     Glances, which you accessed by sweeping up from the bottom of the Apple Watch screen and gave you quick links to things like your heart rate, battery life, activities and your calendar are done, too. That’s what the Dock is for: live cards of the apps you choose and the one you used most recently, instead of a set of features mostly selected by Apple. Even the Apple Watch iPhone app is getting an update. No other Apple utility looks as much like an afterthought as the current watch app. With the brand new Face Gallery, the watchOS 3 app finally reveals all the hard work third-party apps vendors have been doing to create watch complications and even their own Apple Watch faces. However, Apple’s change of heart is nowhere more evident in its fresh approach to activity and health.   Shaping up and calming down Ever since companies started producing smartwatches, there’s been an ongoing debate about whether or not anyone even wears watches. A lot of people had given them up for the watch in their pocket: their smartphone. Wearables were all about fitness. The Apple Watch, naturally, came with fitness- and health-tracking built in, but it was Apple’sbrand of fitness and the company often seemed more interested in people seeing Apple Watch as a watch and fashion accessory first and a fitness gadget second. That changes with watchOS 3. Activities may no longer have a "glance," but now they're a full-blown watch face. So the three rings of Movement (for calories) Exercise and Standing can now be ever-present if you wish. Activities also still live within an app (which means it’s in the app Dock) and as a watch complication. No matter where you find it, though, Apple has done away with the virtual navigation grid in favor of strips. That’s right, if you want to see your activities, you just scroll the heck down.  Follow Lance Ulanoff    ✔@LanceUlanoff Some of what's coming this fall in watchOS 3.0. #WWDC2016 12:27 AM - 14 Jun 2016      2626 Retweets      2121 likes   It’s a much less complicated approach that will surely appeal to workout fanatics who perhaps found Apple’s wearable health and fitness ideas confusing and somewhat inflexible. Speaking of flexibility, Apple has finally opened up the activity circles to third-party health and fitness apps like Strava. Now workouts done in your favorite workout app that start on the iPhone will get counted and continue on the watch. They’ll even let you define “Other” workouts. WatchOS also adds a new workout complication and, when you tap that, up to five live workout metrics. You’ll even be able to pause a workout by simultaneously pressing the side and crown buttons, which means you don’t even have to look at the watch to control the tracking.     Apple seems particularly proud of its new well-being-focused Breathe watch app, a watchOS 3 addition that’s probably not welcome news to apps like Headspace, which uses a mellifluous voice to help you practice mindfulness. Still, I have to applaud the simplicity of Apple’s approach. It’s really just about deep breathing, some flower graphics, and gentle wrist taps to help guide you along. Breathe seems emblematic of Apple’s larger watchOS 3 effort to help you achieve your goals without pressing its own methods and metrics upon you.   Do over Apple has sold millions of Apple Watches, but still felt the need for a course correction. Not enough people want beautiful timepieces, but many more want to work out and get credit for it. Not everyone is charmed by Apple’s cute ideas for reaching friends or seeing their schedule for a day or a week ago (Time Travel anyone?), but notifications, messaging and fast access to utility is something everyone can get behind. WatchOS still bears little resemblance to any of the other wearable interfaces out there, but, like Samsung and Google before it, Apple has taken a major second swing at the wearable market. The Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2 showed that Samsung was listening to customer feedback and took note of the general disinterest in its previous (and relatively bulky) Gear watches. Android Wear 2.0 was also a major update that helped turn Google's wearable platform into something usable. Apple calls its new wearable platform watchOS 3, but it's really the second iteration of the platform. And like everyone else, Apple is finally figuring this space out.
    5587 Posted by YouNet Company
  • Your Apple Watch is about to get the nearest thing to a brain transplant this fall. Apple’s watchOS 3, (announced on Monday at WWDC 2016) represents a fundamental rethinking of Apple’s only wearable. It's a concerted effort to clarify the sometimes confusing navigation, stop trying to control everything and to acknowledge that clever doesn't always equal useful.   SEE ALSO: The Apple Watch's iconic app screen isn't dead, but it is getting demoted "" name="google_ads_iframe_/6692/mash.as/inlinevideoseealso_0" width="1" height="1" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"> It's not that Apple Watch wasn't already a very good wearable device. But, for most people, the utility had narrowed down to notifications, reminders to stand-up and regular alerts about your level of activity ("Look, I closed a ring!"). Watch OS 2.0, which arrived late last year, added important features like third-party complications, HomeKit device access and, of course, access to native hardware for third-party apps. However, that last update also revealed a major weakness: These apps simply couldn’t load fast enough. Pre-loading oft-used apps in memory, as watchOS 3 promises to do, is going to make a major difference on that front, but I think it's some of the other upcoming watchOS 3 changes that will have the biggest impact on Apple Watch's overall utility.   A fresh face In some small ways, Apple Watch is becoming a bit more like the iPhone, meaning that watchOS is inheriting the best parts of iOS. A swipe up from the bottom of the watch will now reveal a control panel, just like on the iPhone. The Dock, which reveals cards of your most-used apps, looks a bit like the apps screen you get when you double-press the iPhone’s Touch ID button. (A swipe down from the top still gives access to notifications, something Apple got right with the Apple Watch from day one.) But there are even bigger, more fundamental and strategic changes. As my colleague Raymond Wong has noted thoroughly, a number of key functions, for instance, have been demoted or recast.       The Apple Watch home screen and its lovely cluster of app bubbles becomes an artifact of a failed user interface experiment. You’ll still be able to access it, but only when you press the digital crown. The Friends Circle that used to come up when you pressed the side button is dead, but the digital touches it encouraged (drawing, sending heartbeats) will have a new life in the much more powerful and cohesive iOS message system. Take Scribble, which turns finger swiping into drawings or handwriting. Scribble is now more or less the same between Apple mobile devices, but there's an extra wrinkle in watchOS 3: It will let you write an custom message one letter at at time — for those instances were the boilerplate responses aren't enough. (In my experience, they were almost never the ones I needed.)     Glances, which you accessed by sweeping up from the bottom of the Apple Watch screen and gave you quick links to things like your heart rate, battery life, activities and your calendar are done, too. That’s what the Dock is for: live cards of the apps you choose and the one you used most recently, instead of a set of features mostly selected by Apple. Even the Apple Watch iPhone app is getting an update. No other Apple utility looks as much like an afterthought as the current watch app. With the brand new Face Gallery, the watchOS 3 app finally reveals all the hard work third-party apps vendors have been doing to create watch complications and even their own Apple Watch faces. However, Apple’s change of heart is nowhere more evident in its fresh approach to activity and health.   Shaping up and calming down Ever since companies started producing smartwatches, there’s been an ongoing debate about whether or not anyone even wears watches. A lot of people had given them up for the watch in their pocket: their smartphone. Wearables were all about fitness. The Apple Watch, naturally, came with fitness- and health-tracking built in, but it was Apple’sbrand of fitness and the company often seemed more interested in people seeing Apple Watch as a watch and fashion accessory first and a fitness gadget second. That changes with watchOS 3. Activities may no longer have a "glance," but now they're a full-blown watch face. So the three rings of Movement (for calories) Exercise and Standing can now be ever-present if you wish. Activities also still live within an app (which means it’s in the app Dock) and as a watch complication. No matter where you find it, though, Apple has done away with the virtual navigation grid in favor of strips. That’s right, if you want to see your activities, you just scroll the heck down.  Follow Lance Ulanoff    ✔@LanceUlanoff Some of what's coming this fall in watchOS 3.0. #WWDC2016 12:27 AM - 14 Jun 2016      2626 Retweets      2121 likes   It’s a much less complicated approach that will surely appeal to workout fanatics who perhaps found Apple’s wearable health and fitness ideas confusing and somewhat inflexible. Speaking of flexibility, Apple has finally opened up the activity circles to third-party health and fitness apps like Strava. Now workouts done in your favorite workout app that start on the iPhone will get counted and continue on the watch. They’ll even let you define “Other” workouts. WatchOS also adds a new workout complication and, when you tap that, up to five live workout metrics. You’ll even be able to pause a workout by simultaneously pressing the side and crown buttons, which means you don’t even have to look at the watch to control the tracking.     Apple seems particularly proud of its new well-being-focused Breathe watch app, a watchOS 3 addition that’s probably not welcome news to apps like Headspace, which uses a mellifluous voice to help you practice mindfulness. Still, I have to applaud the simplicity of Apple’s approach. It’s really just about deep breathing, some flower graphics, and gentle wrist taps to help guide you along. Breathe seems emblematic of Apple’s larger watchOS 3 effort to help you achieve your goals without pressing its own methods and metrics upon you.   Do over Apple has sold millions of Apple Watches, but still felt the need for a course correction. Not enough people want beautiful timepieces, but many more want to work out and get credit for it. Not everyone is charmed by Apple’s cute ideas for reaching friends or seeing their schedule for a day or a week ago (Time Travel anyone?), but notifications, messaging and fast access to utility is something everyone can get behind. WatchOS still bears little resemblance to any of the other wearable interfaces out there, but, like Samsung and Google before it, Apple has taken a major second swing at the wearable market. The Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2 showed that Samsung was listening to customer feedback and took note of the general disinterest in its previous (and relatively bulky) Gear watches. Android Wear 2.0 was also a major update that helped turn Google's wearable platform into something usable. Apple calls its new wearable platform watchOS 3, but it's really the second iteration of the platform. And like everyone else, Apple is finally figuring this space out.
    Jun 17, 2016 5587
  • 14 Nov 2013
    Would you like to improve your social media marketing? Are you wondering what social media marketing tactics the pros like to use? We asked top social media pros to share their hottest social media marketing tactics. In this article, you’ll discover strategies the pros use to boost their social media marketing. #1: Stay Top of Mind Using LinkedIn Tags Viveka Von Rosen On LinkedIn, you shouldn’t send an email blast to every one of your connections. However, you can create lists of “tagged” groupingsso you can send relevant and helpful information to your contacts at strategic times. When you tag your connections on LinkedIn, you can sort/filter them by Tags and—wait for it—send a message to up to 25 people at a time. You can filter by tag and then send a message to up to 25 people. For example, if one of your niche markets on LinkedIn is marketers who target medical professionals, all you have to do is:   Create a tag called ‘Medical Marketing Consultant’ (they can’t see it) Do an advanced search on the keywords “marketing OR marketer OR consultant AND medical” (or some such) Sort by first-level connections Open and tag each connection with ‘medical marketing consultant’ Open Contacts Filter by the tag ‘medical marketing consultant’ Click on Select All Write your message to the first 25 folks Then the next 25 Then the next 25   Tag your contacts for easier messaging. The message subject line might be something like: “As a medical marketing consultant, are you frustrated with LinkedIn’s new visibility limitations?” Use the body of the message to resolve their particular pain point. You don’t have to be the creator of the content, you just need to share it. While you can use a different subject line to share the same tip with any number of tagged groups, I recommend creating an editorial calendar to keep track of what you sent to whom. Use these targeted messages to create a feeling of trust and top-of-mind awareness, so that when your connections need you (or hear of someone who does) they will think of you! Viveka von Rosen, author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day and known internationally as the “LinkedIn Expert.” #2: Post in ‘Micro-Opportunity’ Windows Jay Baer Here’s my social marketing tip, ideal for B2B. For me, the people I want to reach with my social media marketing are other businesspeople, and which activity are businesspeople engaged in all day? Meetings. And when are meetings scheduled? Almost entirely on the hour or half-hour. Based on the way meetings are scheduled and conducted, I believe many businesspeople are checking their social media accounts just before and after the top of the hour or the bottom of the hour. It works like this: Meeting is scheduled from 1-2 pm. Meeting lets out slightly early at 1:57 pm, and attendees check Twitter on the way back to their desk. Meeting goes a little long, and that dip into social media occurs at 2:03 pm. You get the idea. Schedule your social media marketing at opportune moments; for example, at times before meetings are due to start and end. Image source: iStockphoto Because of this sequencing, I use Buffer to set my social media marketing to deploy most frequently in these micro-opportunity windows. I also try to pay attention to when people might be at lunch/dinner; although of course that’s a bit of a toss-up due to time zone differences. I haven’t been able to prove that this works (yet), but it makes so much sense to me intuitively that I’m going to keep doing it. Jay Baer, founder of Convince & Convert. #3: Research Popular Content From Your Competitors Ian Cleary If a type of content is popular with the audience of your competitors and colleagues, it stands to reason that a similar post will be popular with your audience. This isn’t about copying content, it’s about crafting content around a similar topic, but with a different slant. For example, Jeff Bullas wrote a blog post on 7 Marketing Trends You Shouldn’t Ignore, which was very popular. I used his post as inspiration to write a post titled 7 Social Media Tool Trends You Shouldn’t Ignore that was also very popular. There are a few tools that will help with research: Social Crawlytics does an analysis of your competitor’s content and shows you how often each post is shared across each of the social networks. SEMRush shows you what keywords bring your competitor the most traffic so you can target the same keywords in your own content. Use SEMRush to gain insights into what keywords your competitors get the most traffic from. Ian Cleary, founder of RazorSocial. #4: Increase Views on YouTube Using These Thumbnail Creation Tips Gideon Shalwick It’s no secret that getting more views on YouTube can greatly help grow your business online. But with the vast majority of videos on YouTube getting mediocre results, everyone wants to know how to get more legitimate views! One of the easiest ways to get more views is to create compelling, attention-grabbing thumbnails for your videos. The Secret to Creating Powerful YouTube Thumbnails You need to get three things right for creating powerful YouTube thumbnails. Graphics: Start with a good headshot or closeup of your face to create a personal touch with your thumbnail, then add a colorful background—like a starburst—to grab viewers’ attention. Use attention-grabbing backgrounds. Text: Use compelling text inside your thumbnail design to tell your viewers instantly what your video is about and why they should watch it—maybe use your video title.Make sure your text is easy to read, even at the smallest display size of your thumbnail on YouTube, and that the image is on the left and text is on the right. Make sure the image is on the left and the text on the right of the thumbnail. X-Factor: Think about how you can inject emotion into your thumbnails. For example, the expression on the face of the person you’re using can be that of shock, amazement, disgust, enjoyment… choose an emotion that will create intrigue and get people to click on the image. The expression on a person's face can be enough for someone to click through. To learn more about thumbnails and how to use them correctly on YouTube, check out the YouTube Playbook. Gideon Shalwick, founder of Splasheo and author of Rapid Video Blogging. #5: Limit Your Social Media Platforms John Lee Dumas My social media marketing tip for businesses today is to find three or four social media platforms where you can build the strongest presence that will be most beneficial for your business. With countless social media platforms available today, it’s impossible to grow a strong presence on every one. Having a mediocre presence on six or seven social media platforms is far inferior to a strong presence on three or four when it comes to your social media marketing goals. Build a strong presence on three or four platforms. Image source: iStockPhoto. Why spend time on social media platforms where your audience might be hanging out when you could be spending that time on social media platforms where you know your audience will be hanging out? To find out if your target audience spends most of their time on one platform over another, join online groups within those platforms that focus on your industry or niche. If you find that the members are really active and engage on the topics you’re focused on in your business, there’s a good chance that a presence on that platform will benefit your business. John Lee Dumas, founder and host of EntrepreneurOnFire. #6: Find Work With Twitter’s Advanced Search Kim Garst One of the great challenges for business owners is being “top of mind” exactly when prospects either want the product or service you offer, or have a problem that your product or service can solve for them. Think about the billions of dollars spent on billboards, television and radio commercials, print advertising, etc., just to be in the right place with the right solution at the right time. There has to be a better way, right? What if I told you there was a tool that could put you personally in touch with a new prospect at the exact time they desperately needed you for FREE! Interested? I’m talking about the Advanced Search function on Twitter. Let’s say you are a handyman in New York City and you need paying customers today. Simply log into your Twitter account, go to Advanced Search and type in the word or phrase that somebody might use when looking for what you have to offer in the geographic area where you work. In the example below, we are going to see who is “looking for a handyman” in “New York City.” Use Twitter's Advanced Search to see who is looking for a service you offer. Ready? Here comes the magic…… It can help you find your next customer. There’s your next customer. Imagine how shocked Regan is going to be when you send her a tweet telling her that you’re a great handyman and you just happen to be working in her area today. So all the people who say you can’t do anything meaningful in 140 characters—certainly not anything business-related—need to rethink that position. Twitter search is the mother lode for live leads that can create sales for you and your business! Kim Garst, CEO of Boom Social. #7: Grow By Giving Away Your Best Stuff Melonie Dodaro Forrester Research found that over 90% of purchasing decisions begin online. Having quality and relevant content allows your prospects to learn about you and the products/services you offer. Many people are worried about giving away their best content for free. They are concerned it may prevent people from taking the next step and investing in their products/services. I understand this fear, but it is truly unfounded. When your prospects see the high quality of your free content, they will be much more confident in paying for your services because they already know the great value you deliver. Give away your best content for free. Image source: iStockphoto When you create content, you want to think about the problems your ideal clients have and solve them with blog posts, articles, infographics, free reports, webinars, teleseminars, podcasts, etc. Additional benefits you’ll receive include: Evangelists who will recommend you to others People will share your content, which puts you in front of a much larger audience A strong reputation as a trusted authority and expert on your topic/niche Additional opportunities such as speaking engagements and interview requests from the media Improved SEO rankings of your website with quality content Giving away great content opens up an opportunity for you to really educate your potential prospects and build trust, positioning you as the solution to their problem. Content marketing allows you to begin a relationship before ever speaking with a prospective client. Melonie Dodaro, founder of Top Dog Social Media. #8: Connect With Twitter’s Mobile Users Jamie Turner There are two easy things you can do to improve the impact of your efforts on Twitter. The first is to do a promoted post that targets people only on smartphones. A lot of people don’t realize that you can target promoted posts just for smartphones (or just for iPhones, or Android devices, etc.). By targeting people while they’re on their mobile devices, you catch them while they’re out and about and, hopefully, near your business. It’s a great tactic that takes context (where people are located) into consideration when youconnect with them via Twitter. If you’re not ready to spend money on a promoted post, that’s okay, because you can try another technique. My estimates are that about 30% of the people using Twitter are self-promoters, which is a no-no. About 60% are simply retweeters, which is not the most efficient way to use Twitter. And about 10% are conversationalists, which is the best way to use Twitter. Shift to a conversationalist strategy and have a dialogue with your followers to keep prospects and customers engaged with your brand. This deepens your relationship with them, which, over time, turns into customer loyalty. Customer loyalty = more revenue for your business. Have conversations with your followers to keep them engaged with your brand. Long story short, if you’re not going to do promoted posts targeting smartphones, thentry being more conversational and watch your results change overnight. Jamie Turner, founder of 60 Second Marketer. #9: Find Prospects Online With Twitter Tom Martin To truly prospect with social media, you need to understand where you’re most likely to find prospects online—what I call your Propinquity Points. Twitter is an excellent resource for this. First, create a private Twitter list called Prospects. Thensearch for relevant keywords for your company or competitors. Find tweets where folks are obviously talking about your company, product category or competitor in a way that convinces you they are true prospects. Next, add each person to the Prospect Twitter list. Do this every day. Create a Prospect Twitter list. Now, create a column in HootSuite or whatever Twitter client you use and populate that column with the Prospect list tweets. Lastly, filter the column so that you see only tweets with links. Create a spreadsheet to track all of the links you find, and note when multiple folks share content from the same site. Over the course of a few months, you’ll have a pretty solid list of online destinations frequented by your target prospects. This shows you where to make comments on existing content—or better, where to contribute your own content. Tom Martin, author of The Invisible Sale. #10: Easily Connect With Your Email Subscribers on LinkedIn and Facebook Stan Smith Email is critical for notifying subscribers of new posts and generating repeat visits to your blog. However, the latest Gmail Promotional tab addition by Google means that most of your notification emails are routed to the promotional folder where they can be overlooked by your readers. Tackle this problem by connecting with your blog update subscribers on LinkedIn and Facebook. Simply download and install Rapportive, a social CRM tool that displays social network connections in your Gmail sidebar. Add Rapportive to Gmail. Next, export a list of your blog update email subscribers. Compose a new email in Gmail, and paste 10 addresses from your list of subscribers into the To: Box. Mouse over one of the addresses and you will see Rapportive offer a Connect button for LinkedIn or Facebook (if the subscriber has an account). Click on the Connect button and customize the invitation to connect with you on the selected platform. Repeat the process for all of your contacts. Rapportive offers a Connect button for LinkedIn or Facebook. When you publish a new post, update your LinkedIn or Facebook to increase the chance that your Gmail subscribers will see your updates on LinkedIn or Facebook. Stan Smith, founder of Pushing Social. #11: Find Content to Share Using Platform Searches Cynthia Sanchez When business owners or marketers begin to use social media as a part of their marketing strategy, they often focus on getting the right profile image, when the best time of day is to post or what scheduling tool is best. While it’s important to consider these things, there is something very valuable within each platform that is often overlooked. Networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest each offer a search feature. The search feature available on each of these networks can help businesses better serve their customers or clients by providing insight into what the users of each platform are interested in. Search can reveal if there is even a place for their business there. For example, at a recent conference where I was speaking, I was asked to provide an example of an investment banking business using Pinterest. After a quick search, we discovered that there were only two investment banking accounts on Pinterest. However, when we switched from searching for pinners (accounts) to searching for boards about investment banking, we found several. Search for boards as well as pins on Pinterest. This discovery shows that there is an interest in investment banking among the Pinterest audience and the two accounts currently on Pinterest with investment banking in their name were not active. This presents a big opportunity for an investment banking business to become the go-to source for information on Pinterest. Earlier this year, Facebook introduced Graph Search. In Graph Search, you can refine your results down to pages, groups and events. Inspiration for future blog posts or even new products or services could emerge from the search. Graph Search can be very useful for a business. Twitter offers an Advanced Search feature where you can perform a very specific search, but the option to search for tweets with questions is most helpful. How better to serve potential clients or customers than by answering their questions? The option to search for tweets with questions is extremely valuable. Cynthia Sanchez, writes and podcasts about all things Pinterest at Oh So Pinteresting. #12: Make Your Podcast Easily Consumable on Mobile Paul Colligan Smartphones have changed social media in some amazing ways. Perhaps most exciting (for me, at least) is how they’ve helped podcast consumption explode. More and more people are listening to podcasts on their smartphones—and they (and the podcasters) are better for it. When someone clicks on a podcast from a blog, most smartphones open a new window and start playing the content. It just works. A simple link to an MP3 will “work” on most blogs for a media player and a number of podcasters are fine with that. Install a simple HTML5 audio player on your blog that doesn’t open a new window, but does, in fact, give a similar (in-screen) experience to what listeners see on the desktop. This lets the listener read your content while listening to your podcast. Which experience below do you want your audience to have when they’re listening to your podcast, the first or the second? Provide listeners with a convenient player. Let the listener read your content while listening to your podcast on mobile. Paul Colligan, director of content marketing at Instant Customer. #13: Think of Social Media as a Publicity Engine and Distribution Channel Brian Clark The best social media marketing strategy I’ve found (and have used for years) is to think of social media as a publicity engine and distribution channel for content. Even back before Facebook and Twitter, content was the fuel for traffic back to our web properties from social media news sites like Delicious and Digg. Now there’s content, and then there’s content that functions as marketing. After all, no amount of traffic from social networks means anything unless a portion of that traffic converts into customers and clients. The content you create must attract your ideal prospect, not random traffic. To do that, you discover the problems and desires your ideal prospect has, and thencreate content that addresses those problems and desires at an introductory level. Once these prospects visit your site, you must entice them to follow your content over time by email, which is still the highest-converting online sales channel (by far). The reason content works as a social media marketing strategy is that people not only want valuable information, they like to share it as well. This results in an amazing word-of-mouth effect where new people are exposed to you and your brand each and every day via those in their own networks. Attract your ideal prospects, then encourage them to share with their own networks. Image source: iStockphoto People don’t want to be pitched directly via social media. They do seek out and share content though, and if that content is fine-tuned to appeal to your perfect prospect, you’ll develop a social media marketing strategy that works for you night and day. Brian Clark, founder and CEO of Copyblogger. #14: Include an Original Photo in Your New Piece of Content Gini Dietrich The best social media marketing network most businesses still ignore is Pinterest. Too often, we hear, “Oh I don’t have anything visual to show” so they ignore the fastest-growing network. But here’s the deal: Sixty-five percent of human beings are visual learners. That means they’d rather look at pictures or watch videos than read text, yet most of us still use text as our main method of communication. Let’s say you run a professional services firm or a manufacturing company or a software-as-a-service business. If you are creating content for your business, include an original photo and you have something to pin to Pinterest. First, create a board for your content. For instance, I have one on my personal page called Spin Sucks. Spin Sucks on Pinterest. A best practice for a new piece of content is to include an original photo. When you publish the content, you’ll want to pin it to the board you’ve created specifically for the business. Click the “pin it” button and get it saved. Include an original photo in a new piece of content. Do this every time you publish content for a month. Then go into your Google Analytics and see what kind of traffic it’s driving. Even if you don’t have anything to sell online, it’s a quick and easy (incredibly easy) way to bring new visitors to your site. And now you have a huge opportunity to capitalize on that new traffic! Gini Dietrich, founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich. #15: Allow Employees to Advocate for Your Business Neal Schaffer One of my best social media marketing tips, and probably the one that is most underutilized by businesses, is employee advocacy. You’re a business engaging in social media and creating content, but you’re only sharing that content from your company’s account. Wouldn’t it be great if all of your sales and marketing people also shared your content? It would help your company reach more people and help your sales and marketing folks better brand your company in social media. The recent Edelman Trust Barometer reported that 41% of people believe company employees rank higher in public trust than a firm’s PR department or CEO. With the advent of social business, every employee can and should play a role in your social media efforts, and there are now a handful of platforms like GaggleAMP (you can join my own Gaggle here to see what an employee would see), Addvocate, PeopleLinx,Dynamic Signal, Expion and SocialChorus that make it easy for you to both facilitate and measure your employee advocacy program. My Gaggle makes it easy for me to facilitate and measure my employee advocacy program. Your social selling can also be helped by employee advocacy. Prudential Financial embarked on an employee advocacy program, which encouraged their employees to get connected. Now each of their 15,000 employees has an average of 160 connections, meaning that as a company, their message—through their employees—can potentially reach 2.4 million LinkedIn users! It’s time for companies to wake up and unleash the power of some of your most passionate, but often forgotten, brand advocates: Your employees! Neal Schaffer, president of Windmills Marketing, author of Maximizing LinkedIn for Sales and Social Media Marketing: Understanding, Leveraging and Maximizing LinkedIn. #16: Attend Live Events Jeff Korhan Live events are where you experience firsthand the energy and enthusiasm of other like-minded people who share your interests and business objectives. In addition to building meaningful relationships, you walk away with abundant ideas for invigorating your social media marketing. I’m still mining ideas from my experience at Content Marketing World a couple months ago, not to mention being better connected with industry colleagues. Jeff Korhan and Joe Pulizzi reconnecting at the Green Industry Conference shortly after Content Marketing World. One of the challenges of social media is translating our weak connections into stronger relationships that can potentially lead to mutually beneficial outcomes. The solution is to literally get out of the office to meet the people with whom you’re connected online, and make new connections that you can bring to your social networks. When you integrate the two, you enhance the effectiveness of both. A few years ago, it was predicted that webinars and other digital events would eventually replace live events, thereby putting professional speakers and trainers like me out of business as we know it. It turns out we are now experiencing a resurgence of live events, and the reason is somewhat surprising. Now we are more connected than ever as a result of social media and people want to meet their connections in person to further develop their relationships. The community and energy of live events adds richness and depth to your social media relationships, and makes a positive impact on that illusive metric—your social media ROI. Jeff Korhan is a small business marketing expert and the author of Built-In Social: Essential Social Marketing Practices for Every Small Business. #17: Build Authority Relationships With Google+ Reverse Image Lookup John Jantsch Networking for link relationships has taken on a bit of a popularity feel due to Google’s emphasis on authority when it comes to content. Links from sites that Google ranks highly have always been important, but now individuals inside of Google+ carry a great deal of weight as well. It’s important to build relationships in your industry with those authors whom Google already thinks highly of. I’m not talking about stalking, I’m talking about discovering the most valuable relationships and finding ways to build value within them. Find those authors in your industry who appear with an author box in common searches with your industry and do a Google reverse image search tofind where they contribute content currently. Find an author whose image shows next to highly indexed content Navigate to their Google+ profile, right-click their profile image and copy the image URL Paste the image URL into a Google Search by Image box Scan the results to find a great deal about their contributed content landscape Create a plan to build relationships based on value   Reverse Google image lookup reveals a list of places where this author contributes. You’ll turn up some great guest post opportunity possibilities for yourself, as well as gain some insight into ways you can connect with authors of authority. John Jantsch is a marketing consultant, speaker and author of Duct Tape Marketing, The Commitment Engine and The Referral Engine and the founder of the Duct Tape Marketing Consultant Network. #18: Actively Use SlideShare Pro to Acquire Subscribers Joe Pulizzi A subscription strategy is critical to any social media and content marketing professional. I’m astounded that more marketers aren’t actively using SlideShare to acquire subscribers. If you’re not familiar, SlideShare was purchased by LinkedIn and sees about 100 million visitors per month. Simply put, SlideShare is the YouTube for PowerPoint presentations (and so much more). A SlideShare Pro account starts at $16 per month and lets you collect leads and/or subscribers. Also, SlideShare can be integrated with most marketing automation systems. At Content Marketing Institute, we’ve been using SlideShare Pro for two years now, and it’s our number-two overall source for new subscribers. We’ve done nothing different with deploying content on SlideShare, but now we actively drive new leads. The images below show one of our presentations on SlideShare. Use SlideShare to acquire subscribers to your content. The second screenshot shows the SlideShare Pro subscription popover that appears near slide 10 of a presentation. The popover can easily be skipped so viewers can access the full content, but on this presentation alone, we’ve collected over 500 subscribers with no additional work. The SlideShare Pro popover can collect more subscribers. Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute. Who are these social media pros?   The social media marketing experts who contributed to this article are all speaking at Social Media Marketing World 2014.   The conference features 60+ pros who will help you master social media marketing! Join Chris Brogan (co-author of The Impact Equation), Mari Smith (co-author ofFacebook Marketing: An Hour a Day), Michael Hyatt (author of Platform), Jay Baer (author of Youtility), John Jantsch (author of Duct Tape Marketing), Amy Porterfield (co-author of Facebook Marketing All-in-One for Dummies), Mark Schaefer (author of Tao of Twitter), Michael Stelzner (author of Launch) and experts from more than a dozen brandsas they reveal proven social media marketing tactics at Social Media Marketing World 2014—Social Media Examiner’s mega-conference in beautiful San Diego, California. Join nearly 2000 fellow marketers at the live mega-conference designed to empower and inspire you with social media marketing tactics—brought to you by Social Media Examiner. Why should you attend Social Media Marketing World 2014? You’ll hear from 60+ of the world’s top social media marketing pros as they reveal their newest social media marketing tips and practical, real-world, proven examples. You’ll be able to take your Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, YouTube, blogging, podcasting and video marketing to an entirely new level.
    5415 Posted by Patti Dinkins
  • Would you like to improve your social media marketing? Are you wondering what social media marketing tactics the pros like to use? We asked top social media pros to share their hottest social media marketing tactics. In this article, you’ll discover strategies the pros use to boost their social media marketing. #1: Stay Top of Mind Using LinkedIn Tags Viveka Von Rosen On LinkedIn, you shouldn’t send an email blast to every one of your connections. However, you can create lists of “tagged” groupingsso you can send relevant and helpful information to your contacts at strategic times. When you tag your connections on LinkedIn, you can sort/filter them by Tags and—wait for it—send a message to up to 25 people at a time. You can filter by tag and then send a message to up to 25 people. For example, if one of your niche markets on LinkedIn is marketers who target medical professionals, all you have to do is:   Create a tag called ‘Medical Marketing Consultant’ (they can’t see it) Do an advanced search on the keywords “marketing OR marketer OR consultant AND medical” (or some such) Sort by first-level connections Open and tag each connection with ‘medical marketing consultant’ Open Contacts Filter by the tag ‘medical marketing consultant’ Click on Select All Write your message to the first 25 folks Then the next 25 Then the next 25   Tag your contacts for easier messaging. The message subject line might be something like: “As a medical marketing consultant, are you frustrated with LinkedIn’s new visibility limitations?” Use the body of the message to resolve their particular pain point. You don’t have to be the creator of the content, you just need to share it. While you can use a different subject line to share the same tip with any number of tagged groups, I recommend creating an editorial calendar to keep track of what you sent to whom. Use these targeted messages to create a feeling of trust and top-of-mind awareness, so that when your connections need you (or hear of someone who does) they will think of you! Viveka von Rosen, author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day and known internationally as the “LinkedIn Expert.” #2: Post in ‘Micro-Opportunity’ Windows Jay Baer Here’s my social marketing tip, ideal for B2B. For me, the people I want to reach with my social media marketing are other businesspeople, and which activity are businesspeople engaged in all day? Meetings. And when are meetings scheduled? Almost entirely on the hour or half-hour. Based on the way meetings are scheduled and conducted, I believe many businesspeople are checking their social media accounts just before and after the top of the hour or the bottom of the hour. It works like this: Meeting is scheduled from 1-2 pm. Meeting lets out slightly early at 1:57 pm, and attendees check Twitter on the way back to their desk. Meeting goes a little long, and that dip into social media occurs at 2:03 pm. You get the idea. Schedule your social media marketing at opportune moments; for example, at times before meetings are due to start and end. Image source: iStockphoto Because of this sequencing, I use Buffer to set my social media marketing to deploy most frequently in these micro-opportunity windows. I also try to pay attention to when people might be at lunch/dinner; although of course that’s a bit of a toss-up due to time zone differences. I haven’t been able to prove that this works (yet), but it makes so much sense to me intuitively that I’m going to keep doing it. Jay Baer, founder of Convince & Convert. #3: Research Popular Content From Your Competitors Ian Cleary If a type of content is popular with the audience of your competitors and colleagues, it stands to reason that a similar post will be popular with your audience. This isn’t about copying content, it’s about crafting content around a similar topic, but with a different slant. For example, Jeff Bullas wrote a blog post on 7 Marketing Trends You Shouldn’t Ignore, which was very popular. I used his post as inspiration to write a post titled 7 Social Media Tool Trends You Shouldn’t Ignore that was also very popular. There are a few tools that will help with research: Social Crawlytics does an analysis of your competitor’s content and shows you how often each post is shared across each of the social networks. SEMRush shows you what keywords bring your competitor the most traffic so you can target the same keywords in your own content. Use SEMRush to gain insights into what keywords your competitors get the most traffic from. Ian Cleary, founder of RazorSocial. #4: Increase Views on YouTube Using These Thumbnail Creation Tips Gideon Shalwick It’s no secret that getting more views on YouTube can greatly help grow your business online. But with the vast majority of videos on YouTube getting mediocre results, everyone wants to know how to get more legitimate views! One of the easiest ways to get more views is to create compelling, attention-grabbing thumbnails for your videos. The Secret to Creating Powerful YouTube Thumbnails You need to get three things right for creating powerful YouTube thumbnails. Graphics: Start with a good headshot or closeup of your face to create a personal touch with your thumbnail, then add a colorful background—like a starburst—to grab viewers’ attention. Use attention-grabbing backgrounds. Text: Use compelling text inside your thumbnail design to tell your viewers instantly what your video is about and why they should watch it—maybe use your video title.Make sure your text is easy to read, even at the smallest display size of your thumbnail on YouTube, and that the image is on the left and text is on the right. Make sure the image is on the left and the text on the right of the thumbnail. X-Factor: Think about how you can inject emotion into your thumbnails. For example, the expression on the face of the person you’re using can be that of shock, amazement, disgust, enjoyment… choose an emotion that will create intrigue and get people to click on the image. The expression on a person's face can be enough for someone to click through. To learn more about thumbnails and how to use them correctly on YouTube, check out the YouTube Playbook. Gideon Shalwick, founder of Splasheo and author of Rapid Video Blogging. #5: Limit Your Social Media Platforms John Lee Dumas My social media marketing tip for businesses today is to find three or four social media platforms where you can build the strongest presence that will be most beneficial for your business. With countless social media platforms available today, it’s impossible to grow a strong presence on every one. Having a mediocre presence on six or seven social media platforms is far inferior to a strong presence on three or four when it comes to your social media marketing goals. Build a strong presence on three or four platforms. Image source: iStockPhoto. Why spend time on social media platforms where your audience might be hanging out when you could be spending that time on social media platforms where you know your audience will be hanging out? To find out if your target audience spends most of their time on one platform over another, join online groups within those platforms that focus on your industry or niche. If you find that the members are really active and engage on the topics you’re focused on in your business, there’s a good chance that a presence on that platform will benefit your business. John Lee Dumas, founder and host of EntrepreneurOnFire. #6: Find Work With Twitter’s Advanced Search Kim Garst One of the great challenges for business owners is being “top of mind” exactly when prospects either want the product or service you offer, or have a problem that your product or service can solve for them. Think about the billions of dollars spent on billboards, television and radio commercials, print advertising, etc., just to be in the right place with the right solution at the right time. There has to be a better way, right? What if I told you there was a tool that could put you personally in touch with a new prospect at the exact time they desperately needed you for FREE! Interested? I’m talking about the Advanced Search function on Twitter. Let’s say you are a handyman in New York City and you need paying customers today. Simply log into your Twitter account, go to Advanced Search and type in the word or phrase that somebody might use when looking for what you have to offer in the geographic area where you work. In the example below, we are going to see who is “looking for a handyman” in “New York City.” Use Twitter's Advanced Search to see who is looking for a service you offer. Ready? Here comes the magic…… It can help you find your next customer. There’s your next customer. Imagine how shocked Regan is going to be when you send her a tweet telling her that you’re a great handyman and you just happen to be working in her area today. So all the people who say you can’t do anything meaningful in 140 characters—certainly not anything business-related—need to rethink that position. Twitter search is the mother lode for live leads that can create sales for you and your business! Kim Garst, CEO of Boom Social. #7: Grow By Giving Away Your Best Stuff Melonie Dodaro Forrester Research found that over 90% of purchasing decisions begin online. Having quality and relevant content allows your prospects to learn about you and the products/services you offer. Many people are worried about giving away their best content for free. They are concerned it may prevent people from taking the next step and investing in their products/services. I understand this fear, but it is truly unfounded. When your prospects see the high quality of your free content, they will be much more confident in paying for your services because they already know the great value you deliver. Give away your best content for free. Image source: iStockphoto When you create content, you want to think about the problems your ideal clients have and solve them with blog posts, articles, infographics, free reports, webinars, teleseminars, podcasts, etc. Additional benefits you’ll receive include: Evangelists who will recommend you to others People will share your content, which puts you in front of a much larger audience A strong reputation as a trusted authority and expert on your topic/niche Additional opportunities such as speaking engagements and interview requests from the media Improved SEO rankings of your website with quality content Giving away great content opens up an opportunity for you to really educate your potential prospects and build trust, positioning you as the solution to their problem. Content marketing allows you to begin a relationship before ever speaking with a prospective client. Melonie Dodaro, founder of Top Dog Social Media. #8: Connect With Twitter’s Mobile Users Jamie Turner There are two easy things you can do to improve the impact of your efforts on Twitter. The first is to do a promoted post that targets people only on smartphones. A lot of people don’t realize that you can target promoted posts just for smartphones (or just for iPhones, or Android devices, etc.). By targeting people while they’re on their mobile devices, you catch them while they’re out and about and, hopefully, near your business. It’s a great tactic that takes context (where people are located) into consideration when youconnect with them via Twitter. If you’re not ready to spend money on a promoted post, that’s okay, because you can try another technique. My estimates are that about 30% of the people using Twitter are self-promoters, which is a no-no. About 60% are simply retweeters, which is not the most efficient way to use Twitter. And about 10% are conversationalists, which is the best way to use Twitter. Shift to a conversationalist strategy and have a dialogue with your followers to keep prospects and customers engaged with your brand. This deepens your relationship with them, which, over time, turns into customer loyalty. Customer loyalty = more revenue for your business. Have conversations with your followers to keep them engaged with your brand. Long story short, if you’re not going to do promoted posts targeting smartphones, thentry being more conversational and watch your results change overnight. Jamie Turner, founder of 60 Second Marketer. #9: Find Prospects Online With Twitter Tom Martin To truly prospect with social media, you need to understand where you’re most likely to find prospects online—what I call your Propinquity Points. Twitter is an excellent resource for this. First, create a private Twitter list called Prospects. Thensearch for relevant keywords for your company or competitors. Find tweets where folks are obviously talking about your company, product category or competitor in a way that convinces you they are true prospects. Next, add each person to the Prospect Twitter list. Do this every day. Create a Prospect Twitter list. Now, create a column in HootSuite or whatever Twitter client you use and populate that column with the Prospect list tweets. Lastly, filter the column so that you see only tweets with links. Create a spreadsheet to track all of the links you find, and note when multiple folks share content from the same site. Over the course of a few months, you’ll have a pretty solid list of online destinations frequented by your target prospects. This shows you where to make comments on existing content—or better, where to contribute your own content. Tom Martin, author of The Invisible Sale. #10: Easily Connect With Your Email Subscribers on LinkedIn and Facebook Stan Smith Email is critical for notifying subscribers of new posts and generating repeat visits to your blog. However, the latest Gmail Promotional tab addition by Google means that most of your notification emails are routed to the promotional folder where they can be overlooked by your readers. Tackle this problem by connecting with your blog update subscribers on LinkedIn and Facebook. Simply download and install Rapportive, a social CRM tool that displays social network connections in your Gmail sidebar. Add Rapportive to Gmail. Next, export a list of your blog update email subscribers. Compose a new email in Gmail, and paste 10 addresses from your list of subscribers into the To: Box. Mouse over one of the addresses and you will see Rapportive offer a Connect button for LinkedIn or Facebook (if the subscriber has an account). Click on the Connect button and customize the invitation to connect with you on the selected platform. Repeat the process for all of your contacts. Rapportive offers a Connect button for LinkedIn or Facebook. When you publish a new post, update your LinkedIn or Facebook to increase the chance that your Gmail subscribers will see your updates on LinkedIn or Facebook. Stan Smith, founder of Pushing Social. #11: Find Content to Share Using Platform Searches Cynthia Sanchez When business owners or marketers begin to use social media as a part of their marketing strategy, they often focus on getting the right profile image, when the best time of day is to post or what scheduling tool is best. While it’s important to consider these things, there is something very valuable within each platform that is often overlooked. Networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest each offer a search feature. The search feature available on each of these networks can help businesses better serve their customers or clients by providing insight into what the users of each platform are interested in. Search can reveal if there is even a place for their business there. For example, at a recent conference where I was speaking, I was asked to provide an example of an investment banking business using Pinterest. After a quick search, we discovered that there were only two investment banking accounts on Pinterest. However, when we switched from searching for pinners (accounts) to searching for boards about investment banking, we found several. Search for boards as well as pins on Pinterest. This discovery shows that there is an interest in investment banking among the Pinterest audience and the two accounts currently on Pinterest with investment banking in their name were not active. This presents a big opportunity for an investment banking business to become the go-to source for information on Pinterest. Earlier this year, Facebook introduced Graph Search. In Graph Search, you can refine your results down to pages, groups and events. Inspiration for future blog posts or even new products or services could emerge from the search. Graph Search can be very useful for a business. Twitter offers an Advanced Search feature where you can perform a very specific search, but the option to search for tweets with questions is most helpful. How better to serve potential clients or customers than by answering their questions? The option to search for tweets with questions is extremely valuable. Cynthia Sanchez, writes and podcasts about all things Pinterest at Oh So Pinteresting. #12: Make Your Podcast Easily Consumable on Mobile Paul Colligan Smartphones have changed social media in some amazing ways. Perhaps most exciting (for me, at least) is how they’ve helped podcast consumption explode. More and more people are listening to podcasts on their smartphones—and they (and the podcasters) are better for it. When someone clicks on a podcast from a blog, most smartphones open a new window and start playing the content. It just works. A simple link to an MP3 will “work” on most blogs for a media player and a number of podcasters are fine with that. Install a simple HTML5 audio player on your blog that doesn’t open a new window, but does, in fact, give a similar (in-screen) experience to what listeners see on the desktop. This lets the listener read your content while listening to your podcast. Which experience below do you want your audience to have when they’re listening to your podcast, the first or the second? Provide listeners with a convenient player. Let the listener read your content while listening to your podcast on mobile. Paul Colligan, director of content marketing at Instant Customer. #13: Think of Social Media as a Publicity Engine and Distribution Channel Brian Clark The best social media marketing strategy I’ve found (and have used for years) is to think of social media as a publicity engine and distribution channel for content. Even back before Facebook and Twitter, content was the fuel for traffic back to our web properties from social media news sites like Delicious and Digg. Now there’s content, and then there’s content that functions as marketing. After all, no amount of traffic from social networks means anything unless a portion of that traffic converts into customers and clients. The content you create must attract your ideal prospect, not random traffic. To do that, you discover the problems and desires your ideal prospect has, and thencreate content that addresses those problems and desires at an introductory level. Once these prospects visit your site, you must entice them to follow your content over time by email, which is still the highest-converting online sales channel (by far). The reason content works as a social media marketing strategy is that people not only want valuable information, they like to share it as well. This results in an amazing word-of-mouth effect where new people are exposed to you and your brand each and every day via those in their own networks. Attract your ideal prospects, then encourage them to share with their own networks. Image source: iStockphoto People don’t want to be pitched directly via social media. They do seek out and share content though, and if that content is fine-tuned to appeal to your perfect prospect, you’ll develop a social media marketing strategy that works for you night and day. Brian Clark, founder and CEO of Copyblogger. #14: Include an Original Photo in Your New Piece of Content Gini Dietrich The best social media marketing network most businesses still ignore is Pinterest. Too often, we hear, “Oh I don’t have anything visual to show” so they ignore the fastest-growing network. But here’s the deal: Sixty-five percent of human beings are visual learners. That means they’d rather look at pictures or watch videos than read text, yet most of us still use text as our main method of communication. Let’s say you run a professional services firm or a manufacturing company or a software-as-a-service business. If you are creating content for your business, include an original photo and you have something to pin to Pinterest. First, create a board for your content. For instance, I have one on my personal page called Spin Sucks. Spin Sucks on Pinterest. A best practice for a new piece of content is to include an original photo. When you publish the content, you’ll want to pin it to the board you’ve created specifically for the business. Click the “pin it” button and get it saved. Include an original photo in a new piece of content. Do this every time you publish content for a month. Then go into your Google Analytics and see what kind of traffic it’s driving. Even if you don’t have anything to sell online, it’s a quick and easy (incredibly easy) way to bring new visitors to your site. And now you have a huge opportunity to capitalize on that new traffic! Gini Dietrich, founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich. #15: Allow Employees to Advocate for Your Business Neal Schaffer One of my best social media marketing tips, and probably the one that is most underutilized by businesses, is employee advocacy. You’re a business engaging in social media and creating content, but you’re only sharing that content from your company’s account. Wouldn’t it be great if all of your sales and marketing people also shared your content? It would help your company reach more people and help your sales and marketing folks better brand your company in social media. The recent Edelman Trust Barometer reported that 41% of people believe company employees rank higher in public trust than a firm’s PR department or CEO. With the advent of social business, every employee can and should play a role in your social media efforts, and there are now a handful of platforms like GaggleAMP (you can join my own Gaggle here to see what an employee would see), Addvocate, PeopleLinx,Dynamic Signal, Expion and SocialChorus that make it easy for you to both facilitate and measure your employee advocacy program. My Gaggle makes it easy for me to facilitate and measure my employee advocacy program. Your social selling can also be helped by employee advocacy. Prudential Financial embarked on an employee advocacy program, which encouraged their employees to get connected. Now each of their 15,000 employees has an average of 160 connections, meaning that as a company, their message—through their employees—can potentially reach 2.4 million LinkedIn users! It’s time for companies to wake up and unleash the power of some of your most passionate, but often forgotten, brand advocates: Your employees! Neal Schaffer, president of Windmills Marketing, author of Maximizing LinkedIn for Sales and Social Media Marketing: Understanding, Leveraging and Maximizing LinkedIn. #16: Attend Live Events Jeff Korhan Live events are where you experience firsthand the energy and enthusiasm of other like-minded people who share your interests and business objectives. In addition to building meaningful relationships, you walk away with abundant ideas for invigorating your social media marketing. I’m still mining ideas from my experience at Content Marketing World a couple months ago, not to mention being better connected with industry colleagues. Jeff Korhan and Joe Pulizzi reconnecting at the Green Industry Conference shortly after Content Marketing World. One of the challenges of social media is translating our weak connections into stronger relationships that can potentially lead to mutually beneficial outcomes. The solution is to literally get out of the office to meet the people with whom you’re connected online, and make new connections that you can bring to your social networks. When you integrate the two, you enhance the effectiveness of both. A few years ago, it was predicted that webinars and other digital events would eventually replace live events, thereby putting professional speakers and trainers like me out of business as we know it. It turns out we are now experiencing a resurgence of live events, and the reason is somewhat surprising. Now we are more connected than ever as a result of social media and people want to meet their connections in person to further develop their relationships. The community and energy of live events adds richness and depth to your social media relationships, and makes a positive impact on that illusive metric—your social media ROI. Jeff Korhan is a small business marketing expert and the author of Built-In Social: Essential Social Marketing Practices for Every Small Business. #17: Build Authority Relationships With Google+ Reverse Image Lookup John Jantsch Networking for link relationships has taken on a bit of a popularity feel due to Google’s emphasis on authority when it comes to content. Links from sites that Google ranks highly have always been important, but now individuals inside of Google+ carry a great deal of weight as well. It’s important to build relationships in your industry with those authors whom Google already thinks highly of. I’m not talking about stalking, I’m talking about discovering the most valuable relationships and finding ways to build value within them. Find those authors in your industry who appear with an author box in common searches with your industry and do a Google reverse image search tofind where they contribute content currently. Find an author whose image shows next to highly indexed content Navigate to their Google+ profile, right-click their profile image and copy the image URL Paste the image URL into a Google Search by Image box Scan the results to find a great deal about their contributed content landscape Create a plan to build relationships based on value   Reverse Google image lookup reveals a list of places where this author contributes. You’ll turn up some great guest post opportunity possibilities for yourself, as well as gain some insight into ways you can connect with authors of authority. John Jantsch is a marketing consultant, speaker and author of Duct Tape Marketing, The Commitment Engine and The Referral Engine and the founder of the Duct Tape Marketing Consultant Network. #18: Actively Use SlideShare Pro to Acquire Subscribers Joe Pulizzi A subscription strategy is critical to any social media and content marketing professional. I’m astounded that more marketers aren’t actively using SlideShare to acquire subscribers. If you’re not familiar, SlideShare was purchased by LinkedIn and sees about 100 million visitors per month. Simply put, SlideShare is the YouTube for PowerPoint presentations (and so much more). A SlideShare Pro account starts at $16 per month and lets you collect leads and/or subscribers. Also, SlideShare can be integrated with most marketing automation systems. At Content Marketing Institute, we’ve been using SlideShare Pro for two years now, and it’s our number-two overall source for new subscribers. We’ve done nothing different with deploying content on SlideShare, but now we actively drive new leads. The images below show one of our presentations on SlideShare. Use SlideShare to acquire subscribers to your content. The second screenshot shows the SlideShare Pro subscription popover that appears near slide 10 of a presentation. The popover can easily be skipped so viewers can access the full content, but on this presentation alone, we’ve collected over 500 subscribers with no additional work. The SlideShare Pro popover can collect more subscribers. Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute. Who are these social media pros?   The social media marketing experts who contributed to this article are all speaking at Social Media Marketing World 2014.   The conference features 60+ pros who will help you master social media marketing! Join Chris Brogan (co-author of The Impact Equation), Mari Smith (co-author ofFacebook Marketing: An Hour a Day), Michael Hyatt (author of Platform), Jay Baer (author of Youtility), John Jantsch (author of Duct Tape Marketing), Amy Porterfield (co-author of Facebook Marketing All-in-One for Dummies), Mark Schaefer (author of Tao of Twitter), Michael Stelzner (author of Launch) and experts from more than a dozen brandsas they reveal proven social media marketing tactics at Social Media Marketing World 2014—Social Media Examiner’s mega-conference in beautiful San Diego, California. Join nearly 2000 fellow marketers at the live mega-conference designed to empower and inspire you with social media marketing tactics—brought to you by Social Media Examiner. Why should you attend Social Media Marketing World 2014? You’ll hear from 60+ of the world’s top social media marketing pros as they reveal their newest social media marketing tips and practical, real-world, proven examples. You’ll be able to take your Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, YouTube, blogging, podcasting and video marketing to an entirely new level.
    Nov 14, 2013 5415
  • 08 Oct 2013
    I chose to post these images for several reasons. First, today is International Women's Day (and what woman doesn't love good food?). On this day, I find an urge to say thank you to all the ambitious, beautiful, giving and powerful women in my life. Alyse Gilbert is one of them. Her sweet nature is the essence of strong embodied femininity. These images of Alyse were taken during a recent Sunday brunch atTavern in LA. At this delicious meal, we talked about our journey as young women in the world. We agreed that it is so important to stay on our individual paths, strive for our dreams, and be there for one another!   Alyse and I met in photography school and instantly connected. She recently started working for Tastemade (an inspiring start up for foodies across the globe). She has watched the company grow from the ground up as she has contributed her special talents as a food photographer to the mix. To all you beautiful ladies following my blog, I want you to join us in our brunch conversation. I send you love and inspiration. Treat yourself to what makes you happy today - and every day.  
    3885 Posted by YouNet Company
  • I chose to post these images for several reasons. First, today is International Women's Day (and what woman doesn't love good food?). On this day, I find an urge to say thank you to all the ambitious, beautiful, giving and powerful women in my life. Alyse Gilbert is one of them. Her sweet nature is the essence of strong embodied femininity. These images of Alyse were taken during a recent Sunday brunch atTavern in LA. At this delicious meal, we talked about our journey as young women in the world. We agreed that it is so important to stay on our individual paths, strive for our dreams, and be there for one another!   Alyse and I met in photography school and instantly connected. She recently started working for Tastemade (an inspiring start up for foodies across the globe). She has watched the company grow from the ground up as she has contributed her special talents as a food photographer to the mix. To all you beautiful ladies following my blog, I want you to join us in our brunch conversation. I send you love and inspiration. Treat yourself to what makes you happy today - and every day.  
    Oct 08, 2013 3885
  • 14 Nov 2013
    When school began, my daughter was looking for an interesting way to give memorable gifts to her friends commemorating the start of a new year. Here’s what we dreamt up using scrap fabrics, Art Mechanique Silhouettes and Iced Enamels: Friendship Bracelets Turtles signify longevity. You’ll need: * Scrap pieces of fabric cut to wrist size and 2 in wide* Half inch end clasp findings* Jumprings* Art Mechanique small bezels and silhouettes* Assorted paper ephemera* ICE Resin®* Scissors* Sewing machine (can be hand sewn)* Iron* Pliers* Beads (optional)* Jewelry tools* Thread* Art Mechanique Paper SealerInstructions: 1.  Cut fabric into desired wrist size width and 2 inches wide. Fold both long sides one half inch towards center and iron. Fold down the middle and iron again. 2.  At sewing machine or by hand, sew decorative stitching lengthwise on each bracelet. Trim threads. 3.  Insert end into clasp. Use pliers to flatten, encasing the fabric. 4.  Chose paper ephemera to fit a small bezel. Seal into place using Paper Sealer. 5.   Mix ICE Resin according to instructions. Poor into bezel. Allow to dry overnight. 6.  Using jumprings to attach bezel to bracelet end. Add extra jumprings to fit, then add lobster clasp for closure. Friendship Bracelet DIY Good ideas! Make lots of them!!! Cutting out several bracelets at a time, sewing multiple pieces, and finishing with clasps means you can make lots if bracelets in very little time. Also remember that making multiple bezel pieces saves time too! Susan Walls Susan’s Art Circus What could you make with your daughter? or Son? or Grandchildren? Interested in more mother-daughter projects? Check out these stunningbookmarks by Susan Walls, this memory with Tina Schiefer, and this moment between another Susan and her daughter.
    2830 Posted by cindy Lau
  • When school began, my daughter was looking for an interesting way to give memorable gifts to her friends commemorating the start of a new year. Here’s what we dreamt up using scrap fabrics, Art Mechanique Silhouettes and Iced Enamels: Friendship Bracelets Turtles signify longevity. You’ll need: * Scrap pieces of fabric cut to wrist size and 2 in wide* Half inch end clasp findings* Jumprings* Art Mechanique small bezels and silhouettes* Assorted paper ephemera* ICE Resin®* Scissors* Sewing machine (can be hand sewn)* Iron* Pliers* Beads (optional)* Jewelry tools* Thread* Art Mechanique Paper SealerInstructions: 1.  Cut fabric into desired wrist size width and 2 inches wide. Fold both long sides one half inch towards center and iron. Fold down the middle and iron again. 2.  At sewing machine or by hand, sew decorative stitching lengthwise on each bracelet. Trim threads. 3.  Insert end into clasp. Use pliers to flatten, encasing the fabric. 4.  Chose paper ephemera to fit a small bezel. Seal into place using Paper Sealer. 5.   Mix ICE Resin according to instructions. Poor into bezel. Allow to dry overnight. 6.  Using jumprings to attach bezel to bracelet end. Add extra jumprings to fit, then add lobster clasp for closure. Friendship Bracelet DIY Good ideas! Make lots of them!!! Cutting out several bracelets at a time, sewing multiple pieces, and finishing with clasps means you can make lots if bracelets in very little time. Also remember that making multiple bezel pieces saves time too! Susan Walls Susan’s Art Circus What could you make with your daughter? or Son? or Grandchildren? Interested in more mother-daughter projects? Check out these stunningbookmarks by Susan Walls, this memory with Tina Schiefer, and this moment between another Susan and her daughter.
    Nov 14, 2013 2830